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Kids under 13 y/o and cats - Page 2

post #31 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by emmylou View Post
The original post doesn't make sense to me. Why does it presume that kids would default to dog-owning behavior? In my family everyone always had cats... we wouldn't have known what to do with a dog. We'd probably have treated a dog like a cat.
Doesn't really make sense to me either. The orignal post came out of JulieKit thread in this section.
post #32 of 42
I'm going to go with it's 99.99 percent the responsibility of the parents to teach the children how to act and what is permissible around animals. If an animal is not to be disturbed, then the child needs to learn that we do NOT pick this animal up. We do NOT play with this animal. There are very few children who can't be taught the appropriate levels of respect. It might take a little longer with some than others, but ultimately, most children can learn to respect animals. I suppose there are a few that can't learn it, but.. it's usually the parents and not the children.
post #33 of 42
Quote:
The original post doesn't make sense to me. Why does it presume that kids would default to dog-owning behavior? In my family everyone always had cats... we wouldn't have known what to do with a dog. We'd probably have treated a dog like a cat.
hmmm! I just caught that. good point.

Maybe in that cats are more anxious around small childrens' energy than dogs are? Kids' abrupt movements and loudness can be rough on a cat moreso than a dog? Kids expect a cat to 'listen' and react like a dog and can be confounded with a cat's independence and err...cat-itudes?

Of course that just a generalization---there are small breed dogs that are more nervous than cats and big old cats as calm as a sloth....(I have a old Maine Coon in mind, that I miss)...

Every situation is unique, every pet, every child, and every household dynamic.

Kids can certainly be a stressor on pets but I see more pet families bond than I do unravel (with kids and pets).
post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by emmylou View Post
The original post doesn't make sense to me. Why does it presume that kids would default to dog-owning behavior? In my family everyone always had cats... we wouldn't have known what to do with a dog. We'd probably have treated a dog like a cat.
I think the point there being that dogs are generally heartier, and will put up with a lot more abuse than cats will.
post #35 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by emmylou View Post
The original post doesn't make sense to me. Why does it presume that kids would default to dog-owning behavior? In my family everyone always had cats... we wouldn't have known what to do with a dog. We'd probably have treated a dog like a cat.
That's a good point! I have absent-mindedly whistled to Radar expecting him to whistle back before now - I default to 'budgie owner'
post #36 of 42
Heh.

I'm not sure the generalization of dogs being tougher holds up. There are so many little nervous dogs, and a lot of big tough cats (or cats that are happy to put up with any kind of handling). Plus adult cats can defend themselves just as well as a dog can... they've got the teeth and claws.
post #37 of 42
my children are 9 , 7 and 3
my oldest daughter (9) forest sleeps with her everynight , then the (7) yr old patch sleeps with her everynight.
most of my cats love to be pet even my 3 year old knows his not to pick up the cats , he is so gentle with them. with the kittens we have at the moment , he will either ask " mum can i stroke your baby" and i will tell him yes if his gentle and he is , he knows his not allowed in my room unless im in there just in case. and his never gone in there when im not in there.
so im on the side of if children are brought up to respect animals and other people i really dont see a problem with young children and any animal mixing and living together.
i know some of our shelters wont home to familys with children under 5 , but the only time i have seen a cat not allowed to be homed to a family with a child under 12 was a cat who had major issues.
post #38 of 42
I don't get the comparison to a child thinking a cat is a dog.

Both of my kids, now 18 and 16, were both raised with cats and dogs. It is up to the parent to make she both the child and the pet are safe.

The parent must teach the child to respect the animals space. They also must learn how to handle the animal, i.e. we can not carry fluffy around buy the ears or pulls Fidos tail.

If a child is being irresponsable with an animal then I feel the parent never taught the child how to behave around the animal.

And I can't blame a child that trys to act harmful with an animal if they were never raised with them. That is the parents responsibility to take Suzy or Mikey by the hand and tell them not to touch another persons pet unless the owner says it is okay.
post #39 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by AsecretK View Post

The parent must teach the child to respect the animals space. They also must learn how to handle the animal, i.e. we can not carry fluffy around buy the ears or pulls Fidos tail.

If a child is being irresponsable with an animal then I feel the parent never taught the child how to behave around the animal.

And I can't blame a child that trys to act harmful with an animal if they were never raised with them. That is the parents responsibility to take Suzy or Mikey by the hand and tell them not to touch another persons pet unless the owner says it is okay.
If my toddlers catch me stroking a cat's tail they tell me "Mommy, we don't touch kitty tails!" I taught them this from the get go (but of course I get away with more with my cats as I know what they will tolerate from me).

I used to jog in this park with a large pond. Many geese families. I loved seeing the mom and dad geese waddle about with their fuzzy babies (ducks too). One time I saw a small child chasing the geese and babies. The babies were frantic and the parents were hissing. The parents sat on a bench nearby laughing. Me =

I stopped my jog and told the parents that geese *will* bite when defending themselves and their babies and that really, we shouldn't scare them when this is their 'home' site. I presented it as if I was nervous for THEIR child's welfare (well I was a smidge) but I was so upset for the geese! I must not have been too obnoxious (heh) because they thanked me and ran after their son. (I am sure I got a few meanie comments though!)

Countless more examples where that came from regarding all sorts of animals.

I am bit of an animal protector who has a helluva time shutting her pie hole
post #40 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by AsecretK View Post
I don't get the comparison to a child thinking a cat is a dog.

Both of my kids, now 18 and 16, were both raised with cats and dogs. It is up to the parent to make she both the child and the pet are safe.

The parent must teach the child to respect the animals space. They also must learn how to handle the animal, i.e. we can not carry fluffy around buy the ears or pulls Fidos tail.

If a child is being irresponsable with an animal then I feel the parent never taught the child how to behave around the animal.

And I can't blame a child that trys to act harmful with an animal if they were never raised with them. That is the parents responsibility to take Suzy or Mikey by the hand and tell them not to touch another persons pet unless the owner says it is okay.
I don't think it's about the child thinking that a cat is a dog. I think basically what she was saying is that cats shouldn't be around children because children are too rough, and that dogs are more suited to families with children because dogs are (generally) more tolerant and patient, etc. I think it was basically an allusion to let the dogs deal with children who haven't been taught any better, not the cats.

I know someone earlier said about some dogs being tiny and not able to deal with rough handling either... and I just have to say that I forget that they exist because we're so used to having big dogs. I'm not personally a dog person but my family loves dogs so if they got one it would be something along the lines of an Irish Wolfhound, Great Dane, German Shepard (that being the small end).. St. Bernard..

Jpawz, good job on being diplomatic. That type of thing really makes me mad. But what's even worse???? Seeing the adults running after birds trying to kick them. I had to yell at someone in Boston doing that.
post #41 of 42
Quote:
Jpawz, good job on being diplomatic. That type of thing really makes me mad. But what's even worse???? Seeing the adults running after birds trying to kick them. I had to yell at someone in Boston doing that.
People get so defensive in those situations that you get more flies with honey, as the saying goes

Yeah, people can really suck. Adults who mistreat animals are the worst kind of character, imo. That kind of person is just as likely to abuse a child (or anyone weaker).

Ghandi once said something about being able to judge the character of man by how he treats animals. Pretty smart guy
post #42 of 42
I'm sure glad that our local animal shelter didn't have the rule of "no kids under 13" when I was a kid. I was lucky enough to have dogs, cats, birds, hamsters, and anything else that followed me home.
Blanket statements like "no kids under 13" are unfair.
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