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High Protein Diet Issues

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Just a thought~~

Lots of people are going to be switching over to the cat foods recommended recently, most of which are premium foods, high in animal protiens, and then some which are grain free entirely.

My only concern is those cats who have kidney issues,(I assume those would already be under veterinary care) or those cats more prone to kidney health changes (older cats are more at risk)--these foods are usually harder to digest/harder on the kidneys. A diet of exclusive dry kibble is a main factor, I believe? Concern being a high protein diet could lead to kidney issues? Would rotating with wet food or going mostly wet solve this? This is all assuming a pet isn't already on a prescription kidney maintainence plan.....

I worry about cats whose diets get suddenly switched to high protein--are there any specific concerns people should be aware of? I know that a quality animal based protein diet is the optimum diet for felines. But there is always a but! *Specifically* should older cats get a different consideration?

Have I made any sense


***If this is already discussed in another thread, which I am assuming I missed having not been able to catch up with all the existing threads, please link
post #2 of 11
You made sense. I can't put a coherent sentence together this morning, though. LOL

I don't know the answer. For older cats, I do think that if there is an existing kidney problem, to speak to the vet... and if there is not, then going mostly wet or all wet would be the answer. I think that's a good idea, anyway...but maybe even more important w/the high protein foods. I'll wait for the experts.
post #3 of 11
I have two of my three cats with kidney issues, one with CRF and one with early renal insufficiency. All three of my cats eat a low protein/low phosphorus canned kidney diet. If I feed non-kidney food (and I do), I always make sure to add Aluminum Hydroxide gel powder phosphorus binder to the food. The current thinking about renal failure is that controlling the serum phosphorus is more important than limiting the protein content of the food. If the protein content is too low, muscle wasting can be a problem. If the serum phosphorus is too high, soft tissue calcification and faster progression of the disease will occur.

I've asked my vet about the consequenses of feeding Lola (non-CRF) a low protein/low phosphorus diet. She told me that once she's over 18 months old, her bone growth is complete, so I shouldn't have any problems feeding her the renal diet. However, that said, I try to feed Lola some non-renal food without phosphorus binders each day to make sure she does get enough phosphorus in her diet for good bone strength and density.

I also feel that feeding canned food is imperative for good kidney function, especially in renal compromised cats. Cats are desert animals and get much of their water intake from the food they eat. Eating dry food causes them to take in much less water, so they can run the risk of becoming dehydrated, especially if they aren't big water drinkers to begin with. I also feel that dry food goes against the laws of nature concerning cats...too much grain, too many carbohydrates. Which could account for the increased incidence of feline diabetes and feline obesity. This is my own personal opinion, and I would never dream of criticizing anyone for feeding dry if that is what your kitty eats.

Pookie & the girls
post #4 of 11
I would also like to here the thoughts on this . My two 11 years old inside cats have been on California Natural Chicken and Rice for a few years. The female has severe asthma which is why I went with this food to begin with; I thought maybe some of her issues were due to food. The male cat is a bit overweight and is dealing with constipation problems and has been pooping outside the litter box. He had a full check up and just seems to have too much hair in his belly. The vet suggested a food with more fiber as my two will only eat dry food.

I decided to go with the Innova Senior as it has a good bit more fiber but was surprised to see that the protein amount was 38%. This surprised me as most senior or weight control foods have 30% protein or less. I call CS at Innova and was told that the new studies show that senior cats process higher protein better than previously thought. While I know there isn't a huge difference between 30 and 38%, I still was surprised to see the difference. I don't know if I would go as high in protein as the grain free foods, but I would love to find out down the road how this higher proteins affect senior cats, and all cats in general.

Of course if we speak to our vets they will tell us to feed the prescription diets they sell where the first ingredient is corn!!! I am not going there!!
post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 
Ok, good. I didn't totally lose you guys with my thread

Common sense -- talk to your vet if this is at all a concern, or when you have an older cat ( I say 8yr+) and switching to a high protein diet. That way the vet can run a full panel and make sure there is no renal insufficiencies to begin with.

I just had this visual of all these cats going high protein or all protein and potentially creating adverse conditions.

I tend to do both dry and wet, though I have upped the wet ratio recently (which I agree with others about this--and the school of thought is that a higher ratio of wet food promotes better overall health benefits). And while I am incorporating more premimum animal based foods (and a grain free with Raw Instinct), I am not banishing some old favorites (recall free at this time).

My oldest 2 cats are 9 yrs and 8 yrs old, in excellent health that I know of. But it's something to think about.

You guys sound like you are on top of it--I hope I haven't confused anyone further in light of all the new information and recalls.

What we are feeding our pets is*critical* right now so we are all thinking and overthinking. And food change can cause gastric disturbances and tummy confusion--we are dealing with that let alone worrying about MORE health issues. I know this is all crazy
post #6 of 11
No you made perfect sence...

Here is what I have learned with Kandie and her CRF .... Upon diagnoisis she was put on RX kidney food which she hated.. So I researched and realized the senior she had been eating might meet the requirements ... Took it too vet , he said yes but to add a differetn RX canned for the first month... WHich I did ... Kandie did this for a year and a half... well after the month she ate normal wet... Food was low phos and 28 protein

After 12 months she started having trouble .... I research homemade and then raw.... she starts on homemade .... Things get back to normal and she eats this way till I switch vets...that diet was about 40% protein yet low phos... New vet explains I was on the right track about quality vs amount of protein... Higher quality( dry is good not high due to lack of moisture) protein yeilds healthier animal... Kandie now eats reg canned and RAW ... AVE protein 50%... Yet her kidney values are closer to normal than at time of diagnoisis four yrs ago....

Will I let my youngest have a high protein dry past age 7 NO ... Because dry protein evan though good quality is harder to digest than the same % of protein in a wet and or homeade diet and much harder than a homemade to raw diet...

the research back up high protein in wet .... NOT Dry but dont expect any dry maker to come out and say that unless they have lowered theres
post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 
Ahhhh....makes perfect sense, Sharky. I suspected most of what you said--and your first hand experience/trials/tribulations are spot on. Thanks for sharing.

Dry food is very convenient. And it's hard to undo over a hundred years of the domesticated pet's diet, eh? I do think it can be incorporated in a pet's diet but the key is understanding what comprises the kibble, how to best supplement, all based on the dietary needs/stages of our individual cats.

Stumbled on this thread--for anyone interested in making your cat's food & why (and give Sharky a few minutes off

http://www.catinfo.org/makingcatfood.htm

And more on what Sharky was explaining: http://www.fabcats.org/crf.html

http://www.felinegood.co.uk/treatments/en/diet.shtml


In other news....I was held verbal hostage by a woman (ref from company) pushing Nutro pet food at a Petco today. She was nice enough, and seemed informed. Anyone else see that anywhere?
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jpawz View Post
Ahhhh....makes perfect sense, Sharky. I suspected most of what you said--and your first hand experience/trials/tribulations are spot on. Thanks for sharing.

Dry food is very convenient. And it's hard to undo over a hundred years of the domesticated pet's diet, eh? I do think it can be incorporated in a pet's diet but the key is understanding what comprises the kibble, how to best supplement, all based on the dietary needs/stages of our individual cats.

Stumbled on this thread--for anyone interested in making your cat's food & why (and give Sharky a few minutes off

http://www.catinfo.org/makingcatfood.htm

And more on what Sharky was explaining: http://www.fabcats.org/crf.html

http://www.felinegood.co.uk/treatments/en/diet.shtml


In other news....I was held verbal hostage by a woman (ref from company) pushing Nutro pet food at a Petco today. She was nice enough, and seemed informed. Anyone else see that anywhere?

I do that job also ... and yes for commercial food I do trust Nutro ( I didnt feed gravied stuff so the recall was more for educating customers ) Nutro only advertises thru the demos ... you wont see them on TV or sending you things in the mail
post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky View Post
I do that job also ... and yes for commercial food I do trust Nutro ( I didnt feed gravied stuff so the recall was more for educating customers ) Nutro only advertises thru the demos ... you wont see them on TV or sending you things in the mail
Ahah! I had a near-Sharky experience

Oh I had my hubby, my 2 sisters, and my 2 toddlers with me. I was getting *THE GLARES* from everyone because I was chatting up a storm with this woman

Ended up with a bag of Nutro dry and an assortment of cans
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jpawz View Post
Ahah! I had a near-Sharky experience

Oh I had my hubby, my 2 sisters, and my 2 toddlers with me. I was getting *THE GLARES* from everyone because I was chatting up a storm with this woman

Ended up with a bag of Nutro dry and an assortment of cans
Which bag may I ask... Zoey INSISTS on only natural choice Kitten... she is Not happy with raw insticts( mommy likes it)
post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky View Post
Which bag may I ask... Zoey INSISTS on only natural choice Kitten... she is Not happy with raw insticts( mommy likes it)
Nutro Indoor adult dry....based on past experiences with my cats loving indoor formulas. Havent' cracked the bag yet....

I have THREE tupperware tubs filled with mixed old/new foods

Tub A (Purina One mixed with California Natural)
Tub B ( Purina One mixed with Chicken Soup for Cats)
Tub B (Purina One mixed with Natural Balance Ultra Dry)

And I have Raw Instinct coming this week (along with Innova cans).

So far my cats are all about the Chicken Soup and California Natural. Mixed reviews on the Natural Balance. But I have one stubborn little guy who is sulking from the changes. But I catch him nibbling when I am not hovering--I tell ya -- a watched cat won't eat! (at least a couple of mine won't!)

My goal is to rebuild a solid arsenal of cat food to use in rotation, with specific regard to dry (because that is where my cats cat bored).

Wet food = party time (so we do fine in that department)

** Can I just say that after 2 weeks on the higher end food, three of my 5 cats have even glossier coats, and (this sounds like a total infomercial here) and--my 2 Caribbean island cats who have always just been thin/ sinewy, have already bulked up. I have to keep them away from the other cats' dishes

I tried a few switches like this in the past but for whatever reason (lots of moves, getting the food, etc) I would invariably end up back to the mid range diets. I am FINE with that, my cats do very well. But this has been such a huge wake up call....
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