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I am a person too..YEESH - Page 2

post #31 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonnie1965 View Post
Also, I hear men say all the time not to call them "Sir" because they work for a living.
They're probably ex-military enlisted men. Only officers are addressed as "Sir" and its the enlisted personnel who do all of the work.
post #32 of 42
I think it is the issues and circumstances that people deal w/at that time. I remember I was in a checkstand when I was younger.
My manager had impressed on me the need to get id & check guarantee. NO MATTER WHAT, unless I want to get fired. becouse of my lack of experience at the time.
This black guy come at the checkstand. He is young, attractive, very well dressed and probablly a professional w/a better bank account then mine. I ring up his purchase. Ask for a check guarantee (probablly a thing of the past now) And he flips out on me.
He doesn't care of even think about me losing my job. To him it is becouse he is black. To me it is becouse I am trying to follow instructions and keep my job.

Black, White, Brown, pokaDots. Everyone's got issues. Just scared/offended people trying to make sure no one threads on them.
Not that it makes your life any easier.
post #33 of 42
Man this customer should made an issue out of an inexpensive item and took it out on you!! To me you handled the situation really well-aren't customers' grand sometimes!!
I hope you feel better tomorrow. (and that customer doesn't come back!)
post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by katl8e View Post
They're probably ex-military enlisted men. Only officers are addressed as "Sir" and its the enlisted personnel who do all of the work.
That, and also it can be used to make someone feel more like they are talking to a equal not above them..

i get people calling me sir all the time at work. and in truth i dont like it,
just use my name
post #35 of 42
Aaaaah, what is wrong with people? I think they forget that we are all humans and nothing else.

I will never get how people are jerks to one another..we are all the same and don't we all want to be treated nicely?

Geesh, I'm sorry you had to go through that
post #36 of 42
Thread Starter 
well today was a decent day. Had a few crabby people but most of it was the usual. Thanks for all the support i am really happy for it

tommrow i wont be atthe register thank goodness. although i am thiking about..calling in.I feel like doggy doo.
post #37 of 42
I worked in the public area for 4 years, and understand how you feel! There were times I could've cheerfully reached across the counter, and strangled customers! People can be so nasty. I hate it when I see a clerk being treated badly. If I'm in his/her line, I make a point of being especially nice to them when I get up there. I think you handled a rotten situation very professionally and gracefully. I hope your boss realizes your attributes. I know it's easy for me to say, but don't let it bother you (of course it does!)--you are a far better person than that %%*%*#@. You also held up very well under pressure--which is a heck of a lotmore than I can say about HER!

Hope you have a better day tomorrow!

MargeCat
post #38 of 42
There is a person that my wife and I used to communicate with on MySpace, but never met in real life. She posted a blog about how she went to Walmart, and she was either trying to return/exchange something, or use a gift card and there was a problem. She wound up losing her temper, and call the cashier and a female manager the *C* word and insulting the manager by saying "That's why you work at Walmart". The manager replied "Excuse me, I have a Bachelor's" "Oh I can see you're using it". I don't know what was sadder, that, or the fact that the people who responded to the blog didn't mention her attitude. They only agreed "Yeah Walmart sucks etc.." I was the only one who called her out on it, and she stopped speaking to me.

Fine by me, that's not someone I want to associate with if that's how they really are.
post #39 of 42
Oh, boy. Two things I have to respond to here.

First: of course that woman was completely out of line, and sadly, she's got lots of company these days. The whole "gotcha" culture, as Bill Maher recently called it, has made everybody hypersensitive to race. But ironically, we'll never achieve true racial equality until we stop being sensitive to it. You can only legislate so much -- ultimately, it has to come down to the ability within each of us to simply not notice or care what race anyone is.

Bruce mentioned the Don Imus debacle, and I wouldn't be surprised if that was directly responsible for this woman's behavior. What Imus said was offensive, no doubt -- but it was nowhere near as bad as things Rush Limbaugh and Howard Stern have said, or things many people in the public eye have said about blacks and every other minority there is!

The real issue here is why we accept any of the trashy, tasteless, ignorant, and often hate-based garbage these "shockjocks" spew out onto the public airwaves. All it does is polarize us and -- as in the case of what happened here -- train us to see ugliness in each other that isn't really there at all.

Now, having said my piece on that, I have to respond to something someone else said. I assume that person was not stating this as her own opinion, but merely quoting something she had heard:

The idea that the "enlisted men in the Army do all the work" is a common one, and I think it arises from the fact that it is indeed largely the younger, lower-ranking soldiers who get sent into harm's way. I deeply respect and appreciate their service, and I wish to heaven that certain political leaders did, too -- maybe they wouldn't waste so many precious lives on needless, botched conflicts.

So please don't think that I'm speaking against the lowest echelons of the military. I am not.

But the stereotype of the pompous, bemedaled Army officer who barks out every order and summarily demotes anyone who doesn't salute him fast enough is just that -- a stereotype. As with most stereotypes, there's a grain of truth in it, but only a grain. Most military officers remember well their own time as enlisted men or women, and take very seriously the responsibility to lead their troops with wisdom, compassion, and deep respect for the value of every single life.

Yes, it's the enlisted personnel who pitch tents and haul sandbags, just as it's the entry-level employees who sack groceries or run the copy machine. That's the natural progression of things. With experience and time, the most gifted of the enlisted personnel will become the leaders who ensure that our military is ready to defend us from whatever danger we may face.

So if you define "work" as physical labor, yes, the enlisted personnel do most of that. But "work" is also planning, developing, strategizing, expediting, and that's the province of officers. Without their leadership to inform and coordinate the efforts of enlisted personnel, all that work would be wasted.

And here's why I say all this with such passion: my father, who is about to be 86 years old, is a retired Lieutenant Colonel in the U.S. Army. He was at Pearl Harbor when it was attacked. He served as a forward observer, flying a tiny plane into enemy territory to help calibrate artillery fire by radio. He was shot down in the ocean and floated for hours under Japanese fire before he was rescued. Despite an 8th-grade education, he earned entrance to Officer Candidate School, and he made the Army his life. All over the world, in three wars and countless peacetime endeavors, my father risked and sacrificed and worked his heart out in the service of his country. And for decades now, he has suffered a whole constellation of illnesses arising from exposure to radiation (as a pilot) and to Agent Orange (as an officer in Vietnam).

So there's one example of what an Army officer can be. Please don't let thoughtless stereotypes keep you from recognizing that the service of an Army officer can be just as valuable, and his dedication just as deep, as that of any enlisted man.

Thanks for listening.
post #40 of 42
lol your taking all the fun out of that statmenent you know haha
eheh i never saw it as a slam on officers. But like most places the lower people will make fun of the higher ones.(and sometiems they need to be made fun of), hehe

but what do i know i got kicked out of the army after a couple of year lol
post #41 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolPetunia View Post
Bruce mentioned the Don Imus debacle, and I wouldn't be surprised if that was directly responsible for this woman's behavior. What Imus said was offensive, no doubt -- but it was nowhere near as bad as things Rush Limbaugh and Howard Stern have said, or things many people in the public eye have said about blacks and every other minority there is!
.
And to look on the other side of the coiin there are alot of comedians and such I have seen on comedy central that say the same against..whites. ect. i think..slang and derogotory terms directed at ANYONE..should not be acceptable..FROM ANYONE..
post #42 of 42
Well said!
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