TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › The Cat Lounge › Pros and Cons of Vision Correction
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Pros and Cons of Vision Correction

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
How many of you wear glasses or contacts, or both? I have both and often times my eyes will start to hurt once my contacts wear out. Once that happens my eye will hurt for hours, even into the next day, especially if I have to put it back in. I don't like wearing glasses unless I am at home because I don't have the same all around vision like I do with contacts. Do any of you feel like this?
At my last contact appointment I was seriously thinking of vision correction. It has been out there long enough to be "safe" and well practiced. The only thing is I am terrified of anything sharp or near my eyes. I am terrified that it will somehow not work and make my vision worse than it already is. I have not been able to see without glasses since the 5th grade. I would love to wake up and be able to see. I know it costs alot, and I've heard that once it's done, it lasts forever, or for LONG time and the costs would eventually add up to years of contact/glasses visits and renewing prescriptions. Has anyone ever had it done or ever thought of doing this or feel the same way?
post #2 of 21
I know several people at work that had them done. Some younger, some older. The older co-worker had a lot of problems with the surgery. The younger ones didn't.

I have not really looked into it (do wear glasses). I had contacts for awhile but the last time I had them I could not keep the protein from building up - they were sterilized daily - still did not help.

I understand that after a certain age you may not be able to really correct your eyesight very well and still might need to get reading glasses. And I've heard the surgery does NOT last forever.

Talk it over with a good eye surgeon (maybe 2 of them) and get all the pros/cons before you put out money to have the surgery done.
post #3 of 21
Years ago I used to wear contact lenses all of the time. Not sure when, but eventually I stopped. No matter the type of soft contact I used they built up loads of protein on the lenses and caused my eyes to itch and burn. Eventually I just stopped using contact lenses all together.

I'm 45 now and have thought about going back to contact lenses, but I'm not sure if that would work. I don't need glasses to read anymore and when I try I feel like I'm going cross-eyed and get a headache. Plus now I have an "in between" stage where at a certain distance things are somewhat blurry without glasses, but I get that cross-eyed feeling with glasses. So I think I need trifocals for close, middle and distant. Not sure how that would work with contact lenses.

I have thought about vision correction with laser but I don't know if I would be a candidate for that or not. I have an increase in my eye pressure which is indicative of glaucoma, but in my case my eye doctor says it's not glaucoma. You have to have 100% healthy eyes save for the shape of the eye which is what causes you to require glasses.

Also, vision correction is so new that there is really no long term studies showing any ill effects. For all I know vision correction today could mean an improvement in my vision, but 25 years from now it could mean blindness.

As well, vision correction doesn't mean you won't need glasses anymore. While that may be true for some, some may just require a less strong prescription, while others may over compensate with their vision and suddenly find that they need glasses for reading when they didn't before. Basically it's a roll of the dice.
post #4 of 21
I've known quite a few people who have had this done with no side effects or problems. Now me on the other hand am not able to get this done. One thing for me is that as bad as my eyes are (I've been wearing glasses since I was 4) it would not correct me to not wearing glasses or contacts but put me into regular people prescription. Second, this year they have for sure seen lattice degeneration in my eyes which means they are going to just keep getting worse. Also with as near sighted as I am I have a very very high risk of retnial detachment with any trama to the eye or head. Meaning a laser messing around in my eye would probably cause the distachment in moments and I could go blind. So... with all that against me, I keep wearing my contacts, struggle though trying to see out of my glasses anymore and just be glad that I can see at all at any point in time. I'm hoping that I will begin to slow down in the deteriation and that I will be able to see for the rest of my life! But I just won't know. Being only 28 doesn't give me much solice in that so far but I just keep hoping they'll come up with something else!

If you don't have any of these issues I think you should be fine to get it done! You will probably love it too!! Good luck!
post #5 of 21
Duchess, where exactly are you? If you're anywhere near Dallas, I'd like to suggest you see the ophthalmic surgeon my parents and I go to.

He's the best doctor of any kind that I've ever seen, he's done multiple procedures for both my parents with amazing success, and he corrected my vision with glasses when other doctors told me it was beyond help. He takes unlimited Medicare patients, even though it forces him to work longer hours for less income. And he had the courage to do surgery on a 95-year-old man who had been blind for 40 years -- nobody else would touch the man because of his age and the risk to their insurance premiums -- and he restored this man's vision! The fellow's wife talked to us in the waiting room one day and said it had given them both a whole new life.

I don't know if I'm allowed to use his name or not -- I guess so, since what I'm saying is completely positive: it's Dr. George Joseph, and his office is in Plano near Medical Center. I would trust him not only with my eyes, but with my life. If anyone can ensure a good result for you, he can.

I should add, though -- not everybody can be helped with the surgery, although some of these high-volume eye surgery clinics that advertise a lot will do it whether it's the right thing for you or not. (Dr. Joseph spends a lot of time fixing their mistakes.)
post #6 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolPetunia View Post
Duchess, where exactly are you? If you're anywhere near Dallas, I'd like to suggest you see the ophthalmic surgeon my parents and I go to.

He's the best doctor of any kind that I've ever seen, he's done multiple procedures for both my parents with amazing success, and he corrected my vision with glasses when other doctors told me it was beyond help. He takes unlimited Medicare patients, even though it forces him to work longer hours for less income. And he had the courage to do surgery on a 95-year-old man who had been blind for 40 years -- nobody else would touch the man because of his age and the risk to their insurance premiums -- and he restored this man's vision! The fellow's wife talked to us in the waiting room one day and said it had given them both a whole new life.

I don't know if I'm allowed to use his name or not -- I guess so, since what I'm saying is completely positive: it's Dr. George Joseph, and his office is in Plano near Medical Center. I would trust him not only with my eyes, but with my life. If anyone can ensure a good result for you, he can.

I should add, though -- not everybody can be helped with the surgery, although some of these high-volume eye surgery clinics that advertise a lot will do it whether it's the right thing for you or not. (Dr. Joseph spends a lot of time fixing their mistakes.)
I'm in Killeen which is about an hour southwest of waco. It's something I've been thinking more and more about. I'm still fairly young, and my vision is stable for now, but it is something I would have to find courage to do. I have a friend whose daughter had it done and she has been very happy with it. Thanks for a referral. I don't want to go to just anyone if I decide to go through with it.
post #7 of 21
If they could put you under while they do it I'd be a lot more likely to do it!

I wear contacts every day, as long as possible. I like my glasses, but wearing them gives me a headache (the fit's been adjusted a billion times, it's not that). Something about the different way your eyes focus I can't do. If I do end up wearing glasses all day sometimes my eye muscles feel pulled the next day.

I like using the peroxide-based lens solutions, they're much better at cleaning if you have a problem with protein build-up.

Someday I'd like to get the surgery though. My mom has already had to do something like that for cataracts, though it was supposed to fix her vision too and didn't.
post #8 of 21
Killeen! I spent my high school years there, while we were stationed at Fort Hood! It's been about eight years since I've been back, but every time, I've been struck by how vivid the place is, just unabashedly itself. Quite a town.

And I'll have you know that I was once the Greater Killeen Rotary Club Sweetheart!

post #9 of 21
Just want to put this out there, but I know it doesn't affect very many people. They do the actual correction in the optical center of your eye, and there will be a pinpoint (seriously, so small that most people don't notice it) blind spot in each eye. If you do something where you use the perfect optical center of your eye, if you even know what that means, you will lose that as that is where the scar tissue forms. For 99% of people it's not an issue, and I'm not even sure that they mention it. It would affect me because of the shooting sport I'm involved with - you know you have perfect sight alignment if you get the optical center looking through the exact center of the peep sight, which creates a slight halo effect. We call it our "little friend". So lasik definitely isn't something I will consider because of that.
post #10 of 21
I had LASIK in 2001, at the age of 43. My vision went from worse than 20/400 to 20/20. To date, I have had no problems with glare or "haloing".

You may want to research this a bit. I understand that there are some newer procedures that do not entail slicing through the cornea.
post #11 of 21
My brother had it done and loved it! He was legally blind, having to wear contact lenses AND glasses at the same time. When he went in to have it the doctor said that they can do the correction, and he'd be 20/20 for a while, but it would regress back to needing glasses for reading and driving with in a few years.

I know my brother is a rare case, because of his previous eye problems, but if you are thinking about having it done it can really help you.
post #12 of 21
I love lasik. Love it love it love it. Best thing I've ever done. I have 20/15 vision and have had no side effects or problems. I definitely recommend it
post #13 of 21
Neil had the surgery done in 2000. No problems except he needs reading glasses at times (this can be partially age related too as he is 51). I wear glasses as contacts cannot correct my vision to 20/20. The last time I asked about corrective eye surgery there would be a good chance that I would still have to wear glasses or perhaps contacts-so why do it??
post #14 of 21
The actual procedure is pretty easy and it does work. But, the problem lies with the fact that your eyes sometimes will change again so you may need another procedure. In a friend's case, her eyes did change and when she went to get the second procedure (which was suppose to be at a very reduced price according to the clinic), the clinic had closed up shop and is no where to be found. Worst part, she now requires cataract surgery and she can't even get the records from the clinic to give to the surgeon doing the cataracts. So, be careful as to which clinic you use for the corrective surgery.
post #15 of 21
I know someone who had it done. I followed up with them over a year. They said that side effects take about a year to show. He didn't have any and was very happy. Check with your insurance. He only had to pay $500 towards the surgery. The last eye doctor I went to told me about the new procedure. I forget what it is but I don't like any procedure that is new.

I would talk to a doctor to see if you qualify. I did a few years ago and I do. I have really bad eye sight. I don't like the fact that you are awake during the procedure. The person I know who had it done said you don't feel a thing. I just worry about freaking out when the lazer is close to the eye. He said the worst part was the testing before the surgery.
post #16 of 21
I wear reading glasses but, at 49, that's to be expected. I had gotten my first (and only) pair of bifocals just a few months before the surgery. Since I had worn glasses, from the time I was 9, this surgery was wonderful for me. I was driving, the next day.
post #17 of 21
I've heard lots of great success stories with the surgery. As for me, I wear contacts everyday and am perfectly comfortable with them- I don't seem to get the dryness problem as much as others do. So no surgery for me.

* i should add that the cost of contacts isn't too bad for me, either.
post #18 of 21
It's true that you are awake during the surgery -- but they can give you something that will keep you calm without putting you to sleep. My mom had that, and she did fine!
post #19 of 21
I wear glasses most of the time, and contacts occasionally, although I have dryness issues and that makes for shorter wear periods.
My doctor (who is also an eye surgon) spoke to me about the lazer proceedure last time I was in and highly advised against it. We have the same perscription (he and I) and he said for people like us, with light to moderate perscriptions who also do a lot of reading (I'm a student) it doesn't make sense to get the lazer proceedure done because you'd end up wearing reading glasses in the end.
I wasn't going to do it anyway, the whole thing makes me cautious due to its newness and I wouldn't like things near my eye like that.

On the other hand, I know someone who is experimenting with hard contacts because she hates wearing glasses so much, and soft ones can't correct her vision enough. I hope she can get benefits someday and be able to look into having it done, I think she'd be a lot happier
post #20 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolPetunia View Post
Killeen! I spent my high school years there, while we were stationed at Fort Hood! It's been about eight years since I've been back, but every time, I've been struck by how vivid the place is, just unabashedly itself. Quite a town.

And I'll have you know that I was once the Greater Killeen Rotary Club Sweetheart!

Wow...I can't believe someone else has heard of it! lol I haven't heard of that club. I'm guessing you went to Killeen High? I went to Ellison. I hated all of it. It was so bad by the time I got there that it just wasn't fun with all the drugs, fights, splitting our lunches, sometimes also metal detectors.
post #21 of 21
I've worn glasses since I was old enough to fit for them - a toddler! My eyesight is so poor, that they cannot correct it to not needing glasses. It would be lovely though to wake up and not have to feel for the glasses, or wake up when away and be lost because the glasses aren't where you are used to them being. I really can't see them so have to put my hand out and feel for them. I remember I dropped them a couple of times and panicked, but DH came in and found them for me.

I used to wear contacts, but stopped a number of years ago - vision correction just wasn't happening anymore and I had a problem with protein buildup too. Our office air is so dry as well, that my eyes would feel all scratchy with them in. Plus I scratched my cornea a couple of times, so that was that for the contacts.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: The Cat Lounge
TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › The Cat Lounge › Pros and Cons of Vision Correction