TheCatSite.com › Forums › Our Feline Companions › Cat Care & Grooming › New to Kittens
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

New to Kittens

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Hello everyone, i'm new to this site and too having kittens. My last cat i had from when i was 5 to when i was 21. It's been a few years and i think i'm ready to get another cat. I was going to get 2 kittens as there long days in my schedule from tiem to time and i'd like them to have company.

Was wondering about any quick hints or tips? Also had a question on automatic litter boxes and what people think is the best brand/model. Thanks!
post #2 of 18
I'll move this to care and grooming for you where more people will be able to help you
post #3 of 18
When you are looking for kittens - get them at about 10-12 weeks old minimum - any younger and you can have more behavioral/social problems. They should be with mom and siblings till then to learn social skills.

I don't like the automatic litterboxes. Many cats are afraid of them. I use scoopable litter - Arm & Hammer Multi-Cat.

Keep the kittens confined in the bathroom or a small bedroom with their litter pan, food/water and some toys for the first week or so. Only let them explore under supervision.

If you get opposite sex, be sure to get them neutered/spayed by 4 months old - they can breed that early. If you get same sex, you won't have to worry about breeding but still get them done early, especially if they are females.

Make a list of the type of cat you want, color, sex, etc. so you have an idea of what would suit your lifestyle.
post #4 of 18
You say you have days where you are away from home for long hours.

Kittens are bundles of energy and need lots of attention and can get into all kinds of mischief...just like a toddler.

I would suggest getting 2 cats about 2 to 5 years old. They still require and want love, affection and attention, but they aren't as "needy" as baby kittens are and can tolerate being "alone" for longer periods.
post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
Well i had a female cat for a long time and she was great so i figured i would stick with Female. Color i'm very flexible on. So only a week or so in a confined space at first while gone? I was under the impression it was for 3 weeks to a month.

Now by long days i mean i might leave at 6 and be back at 6 1 or 2 days a week. Would those 1 or 2 days prevent me getting a kitten? I've had siblings who haven't had much success getting cats that weren't kittens, or were met with mild success. Granted it could have just been them and not hte cats.

So your cats are afraid? Do they not use hte automatic scooper then and use the floor instead? I remember crystals being pretty good for scoopable litter. I do not hav hte biggest place and just want to avoid coming home to an overwhelming smell (even with scooping in the morning and at night).

I hear declawing is inhumane, whats your opinion?
post #6 of 18
I think getting 2 is the best way to go, if you are going to a shelter they often have cats that are friends or littermates and would prefer to rehome them together. I don't think 6 til 6 a couple of days a week is too long to leave them whatever age they are, just make sure that you give them plenty of attention and play with them when you are home

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shadda View Post
I hear declawing is inhumane, whats your opinion?
Absolutely, it is illegal in many countries and considered animal abuse. It is the equivalent of having your fingertips amputated at the first joint. It is easy to train cats not to scratch furniture and carpets by providing attractive alternatives such as scratching posts, mats, and cat trees. And start trimming their claws once every week to 10 days from as young as you get them, it's quite easy and just blunts the tips so that they don't scratch when they knead on you or walk over your face in the night, but they can still climb and they can still defend themselves should they ever get out.
post #7 of 18
Didn't say mine were afraid - I just don't like them. If you have older kittens or young adults you dont' have to confine them for a long period of time. You'd have to judge when you are home how they are doing. I would not trust kittens under 4 months old to be alone without supervision. Charlie was 3 1/2 months when we got him; but he was not allowed in the basement for about 4-6 weeks after because we wanted to be sure he would not get into things he shouldn't be in. He got to run free on the other levels in about 3 weeks without supervision

As far as declawing - its inhumane - its not just taking off the nails - its like removing the first joint of your finger. Cats that are declawed can have litter pan problems in avoidance or have behavior problems - hiding, over aggressive, biting, etc. Learn how to trim nails and do them once a week or as needed.
post #8 of 18
Declawing is definitely inhumane and unecessary. There are loads of threads on this issue. Regular nail trimming (as pointed out earlier) is the much better course of action....or you may find that it is not necessary to trim on such a regular basis if you have a good scratching post/cat tree which has the scratching posts.

With 2 kittens, I definitely recommend a cat tree or your curtains and carpets may be in trouble, if you have them

Also remember, that if they are not already vaccinated, they need their vaccinations at 10-13 weeks. Its a good idea to have a general health check at the vets when you first get them to see if all is ok, to familiarise yourself with your vet and discuss their care plan (vaccinations/neutering).

Good diet, good healthcare, nice range of toys, microchipping, cat tree, adequate litter facilities, making your home a cat safe place (e.g. tidying cables) and lots of love...and you'll be fine!!!!

Cant wait to see pics of your new babies when you get them!
post #9 of 18
since you have long hours out of the home I would suggest 6-9 months old. That is the age of our two kittens and they are by themselves a lot. At this age they are smart enough to "babysit" themselves and still moldable personality wise. You were smarter than me to get two cats at the same time it's a great idea! I think cats should always be kept in twos. I hope you have fun with your new kitties!!!
post #10 of 18
In the beginning when you aren't sure about behavior, you may want to confine them to a smaller space that you feel cannot be dangerous for them like a bedroom. And as they get more comfortable, you gradually increase the area they can roam as long as they behave and know/use their litterbox grats! it's so exciting planning for new pets.
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnzoLeya View Post
since you have long hours out of the home I would suggest 6-9 months old. That is the age of our two kittens and they are by themselves a lot. At this age they are smart enough to "babysit" themselves and still moldable personality wise.
This is a great suggestion.
You do not need to worry about them being older and not so 'kittenish', that sort of behavior can last until a cat is around 2 years old... or some never out grow it.

A lot of people go to shelters looking for small kittens and may ignore the older ones, you'd be giving two older kittens a chance to have a loving home. Also if you can get them older they should already be spayed or neutered and have their vaccinations. You may even want to consider two cats that a shelter or rescue group wants adopted together.
You'll still need to kitten/cat proof everything and not just at floor level, don't forget tables, shelves, counter tops, dressers, and plants.
post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 
Everyones feedback is amazing. Quite a bit i didn't know about, even for a long time cat owner. Thanks for everything. I will be looking soon for them. I've been thourghly convinced to not declaw. I didn't know it was such a horriable practice. I do have a scratching post already (self made, very proud)...just have to drive to my parents house sometime and get it...(damn 6 hour drive).

What do you mean by this:

"You'll still need to kitten/cat proof everything and not just at floor level, don't forget tables, shelves, counter tops, dressers, and plants."

I understand the plants and their natural desire to dig. but tables/sehlves/counter tops/dressers. How do i cat proof those? Or what should i watch for?
post #13 of 18
plants - some plants are poisonous to cats...they need to be removed .

counters - hiding cables from appliances, ensuring objects/ornaments wont easily fall and possibly cause risk of injury if the cat comes into contact with them, making sure no sharp objects are around or small items which the cats could chew and choke on.

Any household chemicals are stored well away where the cat cannot access them.

If the cats are to be allowed outside - be careful about ponds.

Keeping toilet seats down - some cats drink from the toilet if allowed...not a good idea when there is most likely bleach residue present!

I'm sure there are a few more safety considerations but my mind has come to a blank....
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by minxie View Post
I'm sure there are a few more safety considerations but my mind has come to a blank....
That's most of it

With all the "my cat swallowed a string" threads on here it would be a good idea to keep up strings and thread too.

I've never had a problem with electrical cords, I guess I'm lucky the cats aren't interested.

For counter tops/cabinets in the kitchen, remember not to leave food down. Even if they won't eat it many cats seem to get a thrill out of shredding loaves of bread.
The other day DH left the butter dish out on the counter and we found Tomas licking it... yuck!

I was more or less suggesting you cat proof if you have a lot of breakable items. It would be horrible to come home to a bunch of broken glass or knick knacks.

Edit... Not even a minute after I originally posted I heard a crash from the dinning room. Seems the boys were wrestling around and bumped a plant that hit the plant stand and knocked over a large jar holding plant startings. There was glass and water everywhere.
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by strange_wings View Post

Edit... Not even a minute after I originally posted I heard a crash from the dinning room. Seems the boys were wrestling around and bumped a plant that hit the plant stand and knocked over a large jar holding plant startings. There was glass and water everywhere.
Thats sod's law isnt it lol? I hope the dining room survived.
post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thank you so much again! My final question...where can i find a list of posionous cats? I got shopping for plants in 2 weeks and now that you mention it i'd like to make sure there not posionus.
post #17 of 18
IMO it's a heck of a lot safer to keep live plants OUTSIDE and not worry about the cats eating them! We have flowers occasionally (when DH gives me them) but that's the only live plant in the house - and they are only there a short time!
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shadda View Post
...My final question...where can i find a list of posionous cats?....
@ quote
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cat Care & Grooming
TheCatSite.com › Forums › Our Feline Companions › Cat Care & Grooming › New to Kittens