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Blood typing your breeders

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
This is an issue that Sol, mentioned in another thread, and I thought the importance of this issue should be spoke about.
I have noticed, either, breeders don't do blood typing, OR they don't mention it. It is an only an issue that I, myself have become more aware of, and begun blood typing, and breeding with only Aa type cats.
Thankfully, it isn't a problem I have faced, but have heard of happening, and from my assumption, I would believe many "fading kitten syndrome"
As I have said, I hve just became more aware, and have begun testing, if anyone is interested in the information of where to send your tests, feel free to ask.
I am sure Sol may possibly be more well versed in the subject and can explain more reasons for typing your breeders.
I did think it was something that should be spoke of.
Thank you Sol, for bringing this to our attention, as another test that is important on our breeding cats.
post #2 of 17
Oh yes, many of the cases of "fading kitten syndrome" can be explained by neonatal isoerythrolysis (blood group incompatability). In some breeds this isn't a big issue because most (not all) cats have blood type A. It's basically only when females with type B bred with males of type A you get problem. In a breed where most cats are type A, NI won't be very common. I however don't think that's a good reason not to test. It costs me 28 USD to blood type a cat so it's a cheap life ensurance (I bliid type all kittens before they leave me to).

I'd imagine blood transfusions are more common in the US than here in Sweden so that's another godd reason to why you wanna know your cats blood type. If it's be you HAVE TO STOP the vet from giving the cat A blood or untested blood!

I've heard some breeders saying that type B doesn't exist in their breed... "funny" enough I've always managed to get in touch with at least one breeder of that particular breed that can prove them wrong.

Blood typing save lives!

http://diaglab.vet.cornell.edu/clinp...gs/typefel.htm
http://www.fabcats.org/blood_groups.html
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thank you for explaining the many reasons to blood type our cats before breeding, Sol!!
post #4 of 17
At the time I was breeding the rexes, they only just came out with blood typing as some of the devons were having problems and then they started doing some initial blood typing of the cornish. But I never had my cats done - I only had about 6-7 litters total and that was years before testing.

The one calico that lost her kittens when they were 2 weeks old could have been caused by blood incompatability - never checked into it as she was spayed after the 1st litter.

I can see the importance of testing for the A vs the B cats tho.
post #5 of 17
I had some of my breeders blood typed. UC Davis will do it (less then a vet), just like the PKD testing they do.

Valerie
post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
I use UPenn for blood typing, their cost is $25. I believe there is also an $8-$9 shipping fee to add.
post #7 of 17
not a bad price. I believe I paid $40 per cat for the blood typing at US Davis.
post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 
We typically HCM scan each cat for $70-$80 at our local cat show yearly. The results are read by a B.C. Cardiologist, and doing the scanning yearly, can give a better indication if there is even the slightest bit of thickening of the heart wall. Right now, Winn Feline, chose the Ragdoll breed for researching HCM. Dr. Meurs is heading the research. The gene for HCM that was found in the Maine Coon breed, is different than the one for Ragdolls, however, it has also been found that the HCM in Ragdolls in not-recessive. Our breed has came together to raise money to help find the gene, so we can eventually have a DNA test, and rid this awful disease of Ragdolls and all cats.
For anyone interested, here is a link. www.ragdollresearch.org Continue checking back closer to the end of the year when the auction is held, wonderful and unique items make wonderful gifts for others, a tax deduction, plus helping a wonderful cause.
post #9 of 17
It really depends on the breed of cat whether typing is helpful or not. I read an article from a Feline symposium that said all Siamese, Burmese, Tonkinese, American Shorthair, and Oriental Shorthair cats tested so far have type A blood.

Blood type AB is very rare in cats.

Abyssinian, Birman, British Shorthair, Cornish Rex, Devon Rex, Exotic, Japanese Bobtail, Persian, Scottish Fold, Somali, and Sphynx have a 10-50% frequency of blood type B cats.

I went and looked up the paper. Here is a link to it..http://www.netcat.org/symposium/blood-type.html
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mia mouse View Post
It really depends on the breed of cat whether typing is helpful or not. I read an article from a Feline symposium that said all Siamese, Burmese, Tonkinese, American Shorthair, and Oriental Shorthair cats tested so far have type A blood.

Blood type AB is very rare in cats.

Abyssinian, Birman, British Shorthair, Cornish Rex, Devon Rex, Exotic, Japanese Bobtail, Persian, Scottish Fold, Somali, and Sphynx have a 10-50% frequency of blood type B cats.

I went and looked up the paper. Here is a link to it..http://www.netcat.org/symposium/blood-type.html
And I wish it was that simple. I've also read reports and articles that say that 100% of all Siamese, Oriental Shorthair, Burmese, American Shorthair, European Shorthair, Abyssinians, Somalis etc. have A-blod but I know of B-cats within all of these breeds. Every single one of them. What kind of result you get depends on how many cats you test (and some of the studies I've read haven't tested more than a handful of individuals within every breed, the tendancy seem to be... the more tested cats the higher percentage of B-cats).

Blood type AB is very reem but seem to be more common within some breeds, such as Ragdoll.

You don't know how common B and/or AB blood is within a breed as long as breeders don't blood type. As long as only very few individuals are tested everything is pure speculation.

Considering that we're talking about lives here, I can't understand why people choose not to blood type. For $25-$40 you can avoid making combinations that kills kittens.

It also helps veterinary clinics when they get trauma cases that need blood transfusions... they don't have the time to blood type before giving the cat blood and I bet vets don't like the fact that they often have to guess what the most likely blood type is.
post #11 of 17
Hi, been reading this thread. I have British shorthairs, when I first started with them there didn't seem to be any talk of blood typing them. Luckily there is now, so i just had my pregnant queen and the stud blood typed (cost £150 - ouch!!!). Problem is they have come out as him being an A and her a B. Now I wouldn't purposefully breed this combination (although i know people who have/do). I was told he was a B, but didn't have paperwork so typed them again in case.

Now I know what I have to do...hand-feed the kittens for the first 18 hours or so so they don't receive the anti-bodies against their own blood type. I was wondering if anyone else has been in this position? Or if not maybe just those who have had to hand-feed kittens for other reasons as this is my first time! I am hoping the queens breeder may help as she has definitely done this before. I am pretty nervous! I have still got 23 days or so to go so lot of time! I have ordered kitten milk replacer from the vet. Any advice please would be welcome

It would seem the two different blood types are pretty common in British Shorthairs.
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by pawsandwhiskers View Post
Hi, been reading this thread. I have British shorthairs, when I first started with them there didn't seem to be any talk of blood typing them. Luckily there is now, so i just had my pregnant queen and the stud blood typed (cost £150 - ouch!!!). Problem is they have come out as him being an A and her a B. Now I wouldn't purposefully breed this combination (although i know people who have/do). I was told he was a B, but didn't have paperwork so typed them again in case.

Now I know what I have to do...hand-feed the kittens for the first 18 hours or so so they don't receive the anti-bodies against their own blood type. I was wondering if anyone else has been in this position? Or if not maybe just those who have had to hand-feed kittens for other reasons as this is my first time! I am hoping the queens breeder may help as she has definitely done this before. I am pretty nervous! I have still got 23 days or so to go so lot of time! I have ordered kitten milk replacer from the vet. Any advice please would be welcome

It would seem the two different blood types are pretty common in British Shorthairs.
Wow, that could have become a real disaster. Strong of you to not just trust he was B. Many would have settled with that.

Here's a good site about hand feeding kittens.

I'm sure you'll work it out just fine. Good luck!
post #13 of 17
IMO

Frankly I haven't had my cats blood typed - I am really more concerned with Pk Def than blood types. Yes I am aware that Aby have a higher rate of B types BUT, if you study your pedigrees properly, you should be able to figure out which lines work better - which just means you've got the same typed cats anyway.
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abymummy View Post
IMO

Frankly I haven't had my cats blood typed - I am really more concerned with Pk Def than blood types. Yes I am aware that Aby have a higher rate of B types BUT, if you study your pedigrees properly, you should be able to figure out which lines work better - which just means you've got the same typed cats anyway.
Well, since B-blood is recessive it doesn't matter how much pedigree studying you do, it can pop up anywhere. Recessive is forever. You don't have to worry about blood groups if you blood type, if you do that there's no need to worry. Just like there's no need to worry about PK deficiency if you test for it. Knowing the status for be it blood groups, PK deficiency, GM, PKD or any other thing you can test for allows you to relax and you can stop worrying. Knowing gives you the power to make good, risk free decisions.
post #15 of 17
In my case...i did it the wrong way round really. Should def have typed before the mating, still this way it should all be fine! Just tiring!! I also know people who aren't getting theres typed though as they are established and already know they can breed certain cats as have done it before and no probs with kittens. So I can understand why they don't, but i def will for any new breedings (next time i'll do it before!!!!) am nervous though as not only are they the first kitten i've had but its hand-rearing for 18 hours!!!
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by pawsandwhiskers View Post
In my case...i did it the wrong way round really. Should def have typed before the mating, still this way it should all be fine! Just tiring!! I also know people who aren't getting theres typed though as they are established and already know they can breed certain cats as have done it before and no probs with kittens. So I can understand why they don't, but i def will for any new breedings (next time i'll do it before!!!!) am nervous though as not only are they the first kitten i've had but its hand-rearing for 18 hours!!!
The fact that an established breeder haven't had any problems with NE earlier doesn't mean he/she won't. I know breeders who have had B-females raising A-kittens without any problems whatsoever... until maybe the females third litter when kittens started to drop of one by one.

You can't know by simply looking at a pedigree or leaning back on your experience tell if a particular breeding will be safe regarding blood type unless cats have been blood typed. Sure, if you have two cats, both after a B-mother and a B-father, then you do know. You can't get anything else than B-offspring from such a mating but if you don't anything about the blood types in the pedigree... you can't know.
post #17 of 17
Yeah i guess thats true, just shows u can't be sure unless you blood type. i was told my stud was a b on the basis of looking at his pedigree, so just shows that doesn't always work!!! Just glad i know now. Although they had to sedate my boy to take blood (i was actually quite annoyed as they wouldn't let me in the room with him and so he kicked up one hell of a fuss!) Since the sedation hes been vomiting on and off. Hes a sensitive boy anyway, but this is so frustrating!
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