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I'm all for saving the planet but.... - Page 2

post #31 of 50
Those grocery bags are just the right size, for my small bathroom and bedroom wastebaskets. I also take one along, when I walk the dogs, in case they make a pit stop, along the way. Cloth or paper just isn't going to work for fresh doggie-doo.

The city provides a huge recycling bin to every household. My newspapers, Pepsi cans and most of my mail goes into that. It goes out to the curb on garbage day, next to the garbage bin. The city takes care of the sorting.
post #32 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by neetanddave View Post
I have a cardboard box that I fill up (twice a day) and take to the compost pile.
Is that safe? I think I read somewhere in an organic gardening magazine that it's not good to put cat poo in there...
post #33 of 50
what's wrong with using reusable canvas bags instead of plastic? i carry them in my trunk for when i go to the grocery store. i would use them at the big box stores, but i'm not sure if they allow it. i've heard on the frugal forums some of the big box stores frown on that. at petsmart i like using the boxes that the kitty food cans come in. most of the time they don't bag it then.

i've switched to paper bags for scooping the litter box. mostly because they are cheaper than the same number of plastic bags.

i have a peeve with most of the plastic bags the stores use too. they are sooo easily ripped! most of the time i have to throw them out anyway. the only store bags i really like are target bags.
post #34 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anakat View Post
I use those bags for life that some shops do, They are big strong shopping bag that cost 50p (about 25 cents) and if they wear out the supermarket recycles them and gives you another one free.
I don't like the smell of the plastic bags they give away.
We also use them, but they are more expensive here, $2 each or you can get 5 for $5 and they don't replace them, but they still last for ages.

As far as scooping, ice-cream containers etc are used as well as empty litter bags

We have recycling bins separated by paper / glass / cans / plastic outside and we take our recycling down daily
post #35 of 50
All I know is that something needs to be done to improve the plastic bags. Comparing from living in multiple states and countries, the US is not very clean and litter can be seen everywhere. I am also damn tired of having to pull out trash and plastic bags that get in my pond which can kill my fish and other wildlife.
They have fines for littering, but it doesn't seem to matter because it's everywhere you go.
post #36 of 50
Well after recently working in a grocery store (running the floral dpt, but also checking when needed) I felt i should offer my opinion. I'm all for recycling- Here in Bartlett,TN where Colin and I now live, we don't even have a regular company that picks up recycling with our trash- so instead, we sort out EVERYTHING that is trash and eithor put it in the trash or into two seperate containers to take to the recycling drop offs. Once a month or whenever it's full we load up the materials that can be recycled, put it in the truck and drive it over do the site. We make sure that if we use it and we can reuse it- that it gets recycled. At the grocey store i used to work at - we used both paper and plastic. I actually prefer plastic to paper because paper is tedious to pack up. That being said though- you definitely save bags/ trips to your car by using paper- you can fit much more in it and it is easy to recycle. Our grocery store actually had a little bin that people could bring their used paper bags to and we'd recycle them / I had once customer who came in every week aroudn the same time- always with her little cloth bag- she used it instead of paper/plastic. At first i thought she was weird -but when i realized what neat concept it was, i didn't think it was odd at all- it is actually a great idea! / Also- there is another small grocery store in our area called "ALDI"- it's a small store- with just the basics but they have reasonable prices. They make you put a quater in a lock to "rent" a basket (and when you return the cart you get your quarter back- keeps the parking lot from getting trashy looking). They charge for paper and plastic sacks- it encourages people to bring theirs from home and to reuse them. Now what i would make up for in the low prices- the cost of the bags add up- so i think that's stupid. (you even out) However if you bring your bags from home and reuse them- it is cost efficient. / There is an inconvience to this though- if you don't have a quarter to rent the baskets or extra money for the bags- (what if you want to go shopping on your way home from work and you don't have time to stop home to get 10 grocery sacks to truck along with you?) that's the only drawbacks i can think of. Other than that i can see why people concerned with recycling think it's a good idea I can see both ways on this
post #37 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by lionessrampant View Post
I have a litter locker, which, yeah, is still plastic, but ultimately, you use less of it since you can seal the clumps in there tightly and enclose them in something with much less surface area. Unless you kitties fill up a whole plastic shopping bag...which maybe Katie's or Neet's do!
pretty darn close!! they do have recycling thing at the grocery store, so I usually save the ripped ones to put in there but I need every one of those plastic bags I can get! The Target ones are the best I don't even know what I would use if I didn't have plastic bags

the county I live in sorts all the garbage, it runs down the conveyor and the workers pick out the cans, bottles, etc
post #38 of 50
In addition to the plastic grocery bags, I also use the narrow plastic bags that newspapers now come in (whatever happened to using rubber bands? )

My mom gets her papers delivered in those skinny bags, and they are just the right size for daily scooping, so I have asked that she save all that she gets so I can use them as poo-poo packages.
post #39 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockcat View Post
Thank you ALL for the answers. I am considering this, but it seems to have some bugs - like the odor. Also, does it require any specific type of litter? Tripod insists on the fine type. I think the course kind hurts him because of the way his front paw is. Is it expensive or hard to find?

I scoop frequently because in our small apartment, the only place for litter boxes is in the bedroom. We live above a bar, so there's a dumpster available all the time. Would you recommend it for me?
we bought some litter once in a large plastic container with a lid and handle on it. after we used the litter we put a plastic bag (that we brought our groceries home in) and lined the container we empty it once a week and scoop everyday. i have had people come over and the first thing they say is i thought you said you have cats. i have a very tiny place and 3 cats and you cant smell it at all. this method has worked for the past year...btw im not a big fan of the ban either. i think there are several methods we can use to help out without banning the bags. i also work at a grocery store and i absolutly hate paper bags they tear and are very hard to work with but then again when customers come in with their own usually canvas bags all i hear from the baggers are gripes and complaints. will the ban stop the loss of fossil fuels .. no... will the ban make a significant impact on preventing the loss of fossil fuels... no.... will it make people more enviromentally concious ... i dont think so.... i think people will just shell out the money to pay for the plastic bags.
post #40 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by GingersMom View Post
And watering their lawns, and driving SUVs.

IMO, we are ALL hypocritical. NONE OF US can survive in today's society without the use of fossil fuels. What powers your computer, solar panels? What is the tower on your computer made from? Mine is mostly plastic.

Rugs are plastic, fabrics are plastic. Books are printed on paper - let's ban books, too! Food containers - plastic with paper on them, let's only use metal - oh wait! That depletes the earth not just through strip-mining but through the energies used in the smelting and manufacturing processes.

I could go on...and on...and on...and on....

Now, that I do agree with. We ARE all hypocritical.
post #41 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckblv View Post
Now, that I do agree with. We ARE all hypocritical.
I should be using more ecologically friendly litter for my cats but as I don't I guessed I'm forced to agree with you on this
post #42 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockcat View Post
Question - for those of you who DON'T use them for kitty litter bags (I thought everybody who had an indoor cat did): What do you use instead? I use them for all our small trash cans that require a liner - at home and work.
Where I live we have a special garbage system where our garbage is divided into three bags: green bags are for biological or "wet" waste (food, Kleenex, litter, dog poo, etc.), blue bags are for recyclables (and even things that aren't normally considered recyclable -- they'll give it a try, anyway, including plastic grocery bags), and finally clear bags are for those things that don't fit either category, like clothing, toys, certain types of styrofoam and so on. All three bags must be see-through and must be one of those colours, and the contents must correspond to the colours -- the garbage collectors can refuse to pick up blue bags if there's food waste in them, or green bags that are filled with recyclables. Therefore, I can't put my kitty litter in anything but the green bags ... but I can put my grocery bags into the blue bags to be recycled or reused. It's not a perfect system and relies upon the public to actually make it work, but it's been very successful.
post #43 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mirinae View Post
Where I live we have a special garbage system where our garbage is divided into three bags: green bags are for biological or "wet" waste (food, Kleenex, litter, dog poo, etc.), blue bags are for recyclables (and even things that aren't normally considered recyclable -- they'll give it a try, anyway, including plastic grocery bags), and finally clear bags are for those things that don't fit either category, like clothing, toys, certain types of styrofoam and so on. All three bags must be see-through and must be one of those colours, and the contents must correspond to the colours -- the garbage collectors can refuse to pick up blue bags if there's food waste in them, or green bags that are filled with recyclables. Therefore, I can't put my kitty litter in anything but the green bags ... but I can put my grocery bags into the blue bags to be recycled or reused. It's not a perfect system and relies upon the public to actually make it work, but it's been very successful.
That sounds like the system we have here, although our town provides cans/bins, rather than bags. There's a black can for "normal trash", where the kitty litter goes, a yellow bin for recyclables, such as plastics and tin cans, and a brown can for biodegradable waste. Glass and paper can't go into any of the cans, but there are a lot of igloos around to dispose of them. Hazardous items like batteries can be dropped off at pharmacies or supermarkets for disposal.
post #44 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom2SalemIsis View Post
we bought some litter once in a large plastic container with a lid and handle on it. after we used the litter we put a plastic bag (that we brought our groceries home in) and lined the container we empty it once a week and scoop everyday. i have had people come over and the first thing they say is i thought you said you have cats. i have a very tiny place and 3 cats and you cant smell it at all. this method has worked for the past year.
I tried this once, and it worked great...until I opened it the next day for the next cleaning. I almost puked!! I normally used zip lock bags when I clean the litterboxes and I went back to that. I guess my guys have some funky poo!

This thread did get me thinking though. Everyone is saying plastic bags are bad, but aren't the garbage bags we put things in made of plastic? Are garbage bags made of a different material that makes them biodegradable? I honestly don't know. We try to burn as much trash as we can..including plastic...it stinks and probably that's enviornmentally incorrect, but since we have to pay for trash pick up here (out in the country) its the easiest solution for us. If they do pick up trash it HAS to be in trash bags. So, what about them?
post #45 of 50
I think that part of the problem is that people simply don't think about taking their purchases home in the plastic bags. Stores hand them out like candy at Halloween and most are surprised when you refuse a bag with your purchase (I do that whenever I can). I love stores like Costco who put your purchases back in the cart and you drop them unbagged in your trunk. Sure it's a little more of a hassle to unload your car, but so what?

I think the ban is a good thing, if nothing else but to force people to consider alternatives to using plastics.

Personally? I collect enough plastic grocery bags to use when I scoop litter. When I have enough, I either use canvas bags or ask for paper bags. I won't take a plastic bag willingly unless I know I have an alternative use for it when it comes into my house. Large plastic store bags as well as dog and cat food bags become my garbage can trash bags. Maybe not ideal, but at least they are used more than once before they hit a landfill.

But if plastic were banned, I'd switch over to smaller paper bags to scoop litter. I put the plastic bag into a bucket when I scoop in the first place, and switching over to paper wouldn't be a hardship at all.

Hmmmm.....perhaps I need to start making and selling canvas shopping totes?
post #46 of 50
i was talking to a couple of co workers of mine and the first thing they did was start pointing out how much of the product we sell is in plastic containers and the fact that they started making the plastic stuff because the glass and metal stuff couldnt be recycled (at the time) or because it was more sanitary to be able to use and toss than to use and reuse.i got to looking around myslef and started wondering exactly how much of an impact on our enviroment this ban will have. and i havent come to a decision yet....
post #47 of 50
Our grocery stores here have bags that are made of a fabric-type material, not paper or plastic, that you can buy for 99c at the shops and re-use over and over and over. We have about 20 of them and they are always in our car. Not only are they a lot tougher than plastic, they fit a lot more in, they have square bases with a sort of tray so that you can stand up your shopping and it all just fits better and is easier to carry. They're awesome. For a tiny expenditure you've got great shopping bags that will last for years. It's such a good idea and soooooo many people use them.

What irritates me is that any move that governments/businesses make to try and improve over-consumption (such as this issue with plastic bags) there will always be people who criticise and whinge and moan because it makes their lives a little more inconvenient. My view is, well, our lives will be a lot MORE inconvenient down the road if we don't start making these changes now.

I don't have a problem with changing some of the things I do in order to cut down on my usage, and disposal of, consumables and non-biodegradable products. Sure, it's bit of a pain, but so what?

We do all sorts of little things to cut down our waste. We don't buy those little mini tins of tuna, cat or dog food now to cut down on how many we throw away. We buy the largest block of cheese (for example) so as not to have a ton of wrappers. We have plastic ziplock bags that we wash and dry and use again. We have significantly cut down the amount of processed food we eat so as to have less packaging to dispose of. We use biodegradable detergents, cleaners and washing powder.

We use newspaper to clean the litter and the dog's poo - sure, again, a bit more of a hassle but really not that much. It's a hassle we're prepared to wear in order to have more sustainable lifestyles. We use a certain amount of fuel per week and if we run out before our designated day we use public transport or ride our bikes. We never use plastic bags at the shops, and if we have items that can be carried without a bag at all that's what we'll do.

Yes, we've had to change our lives so that our mod cons and conveniences and little things that we did to make our lives easier have been altered and we do put more of an effort into things to be more environmentally friendly. It's a bit of a pain at first and then you just do it naturally. It's easy to say you want to do your bit for the environment - but I know a lot of people who talk about it and advocate it, just so long as they don't actually have to change anything they're doing.

Human beings are lazy; everything we do is aimed at improving, speeding up, making things easier and focusing on us not actually having to expend any effort to do anything. Ellen Degeneres said it the funniest way, `We now have breath strips that dissolve on our tongue. What, we can't suck anymore?'

It's time to wake up and smell the roses. If plastic bags are a start, then so be it. Our lives are going to be a LOT more difficult in the long run if we don't make these little adjustments and sacrifices now, and just spend a little bit longer in our day (probably about 20 minutes) doing things right by our beautiful green earth.
post #48 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by KitEKats4Eva! View Post
Our grocery stores here have bags that are made of a fabric-type material, not paper or plastic, that you can buy for 99c at the shops and re-use over and over and over. We have about 20 of them and they are always in our car. Not only are they a lot tougher than plastic, they fit a lot more in, they have square bases with a sort of tray so that you can stand up your shopping and it all just fits better and is easier to carry. They're awesome. For a tiny expenditure you've got great shopping bags that will last for years. It's such a good idea and soooooo many people use them.

What irritates me is that any move that governments/businesses make to try and improve over-consumption (such as this issue with plastic bags) there will always be people who criticise and whinge and moan because it makes their lives a little more inconvenient. My view is, well, our lives will be a lot MORE inconvenient down the road if we don't start making these changes now.

I don't have a problem with changing some of the things I do in order to cut down on my usage, and disposal of, consumables and non-biodegradable products. Sure, it's bit of a pain, but so what?

We do all sorts of little things to cut down our waste. We don't buy those little mini tins of tuna, cat or dog food now to cut down on how many we throw away. We buy the largest block of cheese (for example) so as not to have a ton of wrappers. We have plastic ziplock bags that we wash and dry and use again. We have significantly cut down the amount of processed food we eat so as to have less packaging to dispose of. We use biodegradable detergents, cleaners and washing powder.

We use newspaper to clean the litter and the dog's poo - sure, again, a bit more of a hassle but really not that much. It's a hassle we're prepared to wear in order to have more sustainable lifestyles. We use a certain amount of fuel per week and if we run out before our designated day we use public transport or ride our bikes. We never use plastic bags at the shops, and if we have items that can be carried without a bag at all that's what we'll do.

Yes, we've had to change our lives so that our mod cons and conveniences and little things that we did to make our lives easier have been altered and we do put more of an effort into things to be more environmentally friendly. It's a bit of a pain at first and then you just do it naturally. It's easy to say you want to do your bit for the environment - but I know a lot of people who talk about it and advocate it, just so long as they don't actually have to change anything they're doing.

Human beings are lazy; everything we do is aimed at improving, speeding up, making things easier and focusing on us not actually having to expend any effort to do anything. Ellen Degeneres said it the funniest way, `We now have breath strips that dissolve on our tongue. What, we can't suck anymore?'

It's time to wake up and smell the roses. If plastic bags are a start, then so be it. Our lives are going to be a LOT more difficult in the long run if we don't make these little adjustments and sacrifices now, and just spend a little bit longer in our day (probably about 20 minutes) doing things right by our beautiful green earth.
Yes! Exactly!

And think of how tiny some of the things we can do really are! Just turning off lights or unplugging the TV when we leave the house (that'll also save you a boatload of cash, I have come to find firsthand), even eating meat one or two fewer times per week if you're not vegetarian or vegan, or reusing as many things as we can...it's really not that big of a deal to take a canvas bag to the grocery store, and I've personally found that it HELPS me, since I'm a perpetual pedestrian.

Which reminds me, if you're lucky enough to live in a big city (where it's hard NOT to conserve, really), the Great Bike Commutes are all coming up in the next couple of months and they are GREAT FUN! And you get free coffee and bagels, too
post #49 of 50
First of all, it doesn't matter what they are made of, unless the bags decompose in an anaerobic atmosphere, they won't decompose in a landfill. Most of the waste is buried immediately after getting to one and doesn't see any oxygen unless disturbed. Excavations into landfills show vegetable matter and newspapers virtually untouched by decomposition A reason for turning a compost pile is to allow oxygen in.

So instead of banning something, it should have a cost associated with it. Start charging a tax on bags, and you will see less consumption of the bags. Change the material and you will just see a different environmental cost. Ok - we don't want to use fossil fuels so we switch to a corn-based plastic. Low and behold, the price of corn goes up and pulls more people into growing it. More pesticides don't matter because the corn isn't for consumption.

Every action has an unintended reaction especially when we deal with environmental matters.
post #50 of 50
If we are no longer able to use plastic bags from the store then whay am I going to use to line my small office garbage cane, and what will I use to put garbage in the car?? I kind of see the reasoning behind it, but come on.
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