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Why adopt a purebred?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Please let me start by saying I know literally nothing about cat breeds. To me a cat is a cat is a cat....

So to all of you experts in your field: I would like to know the advantages of adopting a purebred.

I was talking to someone about dogs the other day, and they said that it's easier to adopt a dog of a certain breed because you'll have a better idea of their temperment, so you're more likely to know what you're getting yourself into beforehand. Is it the same for cats? Although all animals are individuals it seems (to my uneducated self) that there's less drastic variation among cat personalities compared to dogs, so perhaps this is a less valid reason in ths case? Or am I totally wrong here? Why else is getting a certain breed "better" than your standard domestic cat?

Although I have no interest in adding another member to my family at the moment, I'd like you to sell me on the idea of purebreds! Educate me, please!
post #2 of 16
Yes the basic reasons for a purebreed dog go for a cat .... you have an idea of the final kittys looks , temperment , personality
post #3 of 16
yes the idea behind purebreds for anything, are all basic. Your more likely to get a specific, look, temperment, ect with certain purebreds of anything.

Like with Persians, my chosen breed, I know i am going to get a long haired, cobby, friendly, loving cat in general of course every cat has personalities of their own but general things stay the same.
post #4 of 16
I agree... looks, temperament, and personality. Another big plus is being assured that the cat will be healthy and won't have had to deal with the diseases that shelter cats have possibly come into contact with. Some cat breeds have some health problems associated with their breeds, but most don't... at least not nearly to the extent of dog breeds.

I have a Burmese... she's chocolate brown with a smooshy face. She's such a lap cat, and follows me around like a little puppy dog. Nothing bothers her and she tries to mother all my other cats.

I also have an unfolded Scottish Fold. She has such a cute face and calm personality. She's my peacemaker... whenever there's an argument, she's the one to break it up. She purrs like a motorboat.

I also have some moggies, and I love them just as much... but I was enchanted by the Burmese personality and look and *had* to have one!
post #5 of 16
Then again, purebreeds you also know what genetic problems come with the pedigree. When a moggie, you never know what the genetic factors may be. That being said, moggies are typically more "healthy" than purebreds because of the mix of genetics.

There are also those people who desire the pedigree, the look of that cat, the personality, whatever of a specific breed, but want to rescue, not buy. There are simply purrsonal reasons as well!
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Godiva View Post
I agree... looks, temperament, and personality. Another big plus is being assured that the cat will be healthy and won't have had to deal with the diseases that shelter cats have possibly come into contact with. Some cat breeds have some health problems associated with their breeds, but most don't... at least not nearly to the extent of dog breeds.
That's a very good point I never thought of. I guess I just assumed that cat breeds were as prone to certain health problems as with dog breeds. Is this because cats are generally less inbred than dogs (which I've been told is a major contributing factor to the health issues)?

I suppose with a purebred you'd also be pretty guaranteed about their early upbringing but with a stray/shelter cat.... well it's a mixed bag, isn't it?

Thank you for your replies. This is very interesting information to me as, like I said before, I know nothing about cat breeds.
post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by white cat lover View Post
There are also those people who desire the pedigree, the look of that cat, the personality, whatever of a specific breed, but want to rescue, not buy. There are simply purrsonal reasons as well!
I guess that's why I'm a bit puzzled about preferring a purebred to an "assorted" cat. To me, there are so many shelter cats available, I don't understand why one would rather breed and buy a purebred. (Please: I am not being judgemental about what kind of cat a person chooses to adopt. As long as it has a loving, safe & healthy place to live I cannot and will not criticize). In a way I guess it's kind of like expecting people to adopt a child rather than have their own- after all there are so many unwanted children, how can you justify having your own when you could adopt one instead?!

Somehow I can understand an inherent value in a purebred animal, but I'm struggling to articulate what exactly the value is, which is why I'm asking these questions.

I can only assume that breeders (and buyers!), as animal lovers, have struggled with these questions themselves, so I'm hoping someone might share their insights.
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pekoe & Nigel View Post
I guess that's why I'm a bit puzzled about preferring a purebred to an "assorted" cat. To me, there are so many shelter cats available, I don't understand why one would rather breed and buy a purebred. (Please: I am not being judgemental about what kind of cat a person chooses to adopt. As long as it has a loving, safe & healthy place to live I cannot and will not criticize). In a way I guess it's kind of like expecting people to adopt a child rather than have their own- after all there are so many unwanted children, how can you justify having your own when you could adopt one instead?!

Somehow I can understand an inherent value in a purebred animal, but I'm struggling to articulate what exactly the value is, which is why I'm asking these questions.

I can only assume that breeders (and buyers!), as animal lovers, have struggled with these questions themselves, so I'm hoping someone might share their insights.

Its a personal choice is what it really comes down to. And papers comes with a "price" i guess is the way to put it. One could say the purebred issue not only about cats, but dogs, horses..ect. At the end of the day its a personal choice.

That being said. Most good breeders, also work with rescues. Be it by donateing, working with or helping out.

Personally my house is outnumbered. I have 6 purebred persians, but i have 16 cats in the house currently. that are perm residence. you do the math
post #9 of 16
I can only tell you why I bought a purebred cat (a somali). It was because I love the looks and personality of a somali cat. That isn't to say I don't love my rescue moggy too (and his brother who died a year and a half ago) but by buying a purebred cat I knew what I was getting. Jaffa is not a purebred and there was no way of knowing what kind of temperament he'd have as an adult. He's turned out to be an extremely lively cat with the physical build of a foreign style breed. I love that kind of looks and personaility in a cat but I think he would be a bit in your face for some people as he's very demanding. Although temperament varies between individuals within a breed you can predict what sort of temperament the cat is likely to have and choose one that suits your lifestyle and other cats.

Another reason I chose a purebred was so that I could see the parents and home environment and know that the parents were both of good temperament and had been screened for diseases, and that my kitten had been well socialised. I ended up with a healthy, vaccinated, confindent, outgoing, well socialised cat. I love Jaffa to bits but he's very timid which I put down to the lack of socialisation when he was a baby. Of course rescue cats can be well socialised too if they're raised in a foster home but by choosing a purebred I was able to make sure I knew all about my baby's background.

Another reason for me which wouldnt apply to many people is that it's hard to get a kitten to keep as an indoor cat over here since many rescues like cats to be indoor/outdoor and won't rehome to indoor only homes. Most breeders are the opposite and like their kittens to go to indoor homes.
post #10 of 16
I think there is a lot of difference in buying a purebred dog over a cat - there isnt' the size differences in cat breeds that there are in dogs.

Can't really answer the why I'm afraid, I have never owned a pedigree, and the only way I would if is one that I loved came into a rescue at a time when I could justify adopting it. I do think that people who say they want a pedigree for the health guarantees are a bit misguided though, you can get perfectly healthy cats from rescues- I heard from someone who adopted a cat from me 18 months ago yesterday, I picked that cat up from teh streets, she was a scrawny, scruffy little thing, and the vet cleared her as perfectly healthy last week, and she isn't the only one I have picked up from the streets who has been in good health. We get a lot of compliments from people who adopt kittens from us for how happy and well socialised they are - yet they aren't brought up in a home environment.
post #11 of 16
I chose the Somali because of the way they look. And after owning 2 I can say they are very different then moggies not only in looks but also in personalities. When new people come into my home they notice my Somalis and right away ask what breed of cat is that?! Somalis are not a common breed and feel it is unfair to them to not exist because there are to many moggies. IMO comparing pedigreeds is like comparing lions and tigers. If there were to many lions should tigers not exist?
post #12 of 16
With cats there is not a lot of "variety" like you would have in dogs. So basically a cat is a cat is a cat

HOWEVER, you have 3-4 main types of cats - the slender/active types (siamese, orientals, rexes, abys); the rounder/cobby/less active types (persians, himalayans, birmins); the medium cats (burmese, tonkinese, american shorthair, british sh, etc.); the multicatagory - these are cats the are sorta inbetween some of these groups - ocicats, bengals, maine coons, ragdolls.

(the above are only examples - not inclusive)

So if someone is more interested in a laid back cat that sits on the sofa looking pretty and is not the type to climb on top of the refrigerator, they would look for a less active cat - depending on coat length they might choose a persian or a british sh. If they liked vocal cats or very active ones that entertain and are quick to learn tricks, they would choose an oriental or ocicat.

Purebreds are more consistent in looks, type, and personality. With a mixed breed, you have no idea how the cat really will end up in looks or personality. But it usually doesn't matter that much.

Also, some people who are allergic to cats might want a less allergic reaction cat - and there are only a few purbred breeds they could have. So in that case, they would seek out a purebred vs a mixed breed.

I've always had both mixed and purebreds. I've shown both too. I perfer the active types (orientals, rexes, ocicats).

First of all, attend a cat show and look at some of the breeds. Read books on types of cats, then decide which type of breed you think would work best in your house and with your personality.


One other thing as far as mixed breeds and not knowing what they will turn into. Ling is a barn kitten mixed breed. Her mom obvious was on the "oriental type" side - who knows who the father of the kittens were. Ling as a baby and up to about a year or so was very oriental looking - longer body, more pointed face. HOWEVER she now is a solid round "american sh" type of build. I would have liked her to stay the slendar type, but she's changed. She still is an active cat (pretty much), but as she gets older, I know she will settle down far more then Charlie (our ocicat) !
post #13 of 16
I can only speak for myself, I fell in love with a friends Siamese over 30 years ago, when her cat had kittens I had one and have a Siamese in my life ever since. When I had to have the last one PTS, I wasn't ready to get another, but Daisy( she was fished out of a river when she was a kitten) was so upset and miserable that we felt that we had to get her a friend, I couldn't face one that looked like Mog, but love the Siamese personality so we got Tolly.
Daisy got over her depresion she hated him, he wanted someone to play with, so we got Chloe. I knew with the way they interacted we had to have a laid back cat and was going to get a BSH when I saw Chloe advertised, she is BHSXMainecoon and just couldn't resist her dear little face Now I just need to convince DH that we need to even up the numbers,
post #14 of 16
Hmmm then you need an active playmate for the oriental I recommend a cornish rex or an ocicat as your "even" number
post #15 of 16
It's pretty obvious that I like Active cats with a Capital "A". I also tend to like vocal cats. Siamese and Bengals both fit that bill. Although next to a Bengal, a Siamese is laid back. To me, quiet well behaved cats are pretty to look at, but not as fun and not as interactive.

Personally, I don't think there is a more active cat than a Bengal, and to be honest Simba and Angel are both more vocal than either of my Siamese. I've noticed that Siamese are much more of a lap cat than a Bengal, but they both like to play and they're both very intelligent cats.

I have also loved the look of Siamese cats. I just don't think there is anything more beautiful than the vivid blue eyes against the dark mask . When I first saw a Bengal I fell in love with the way they look as well.

I don't unserstand why anyone would say a cat is a cat is a cat. The different breeds of cats look as different and act as different than the different breeds of dogs. Once in a while I see a moggie that is so beautiful and unique, that I wish they could be developed into a breed, like Godiva's Toby.
post #16 of 16
I said the cat thing - you don't have such of an extreme range like you do in dogs; i.e. chiwauwau vs great dane.

I do agree on the Toby thing - and I've only seen pictures of him - I hope Godiva comes to MN to show - I want to see Toby in person.

I owned a black/white mixed breed (more american shorthair in type) that had vivid ODD eyes - one blue and one green. Obviously had siamese in the background, but it would have been cool in a way to have bred her a few times. She was spayed at 7 months old
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