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bringing home baby

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
My sister is 7 months pregnant and needs some advise on what to do with her 1 year old cat when the new baby comes. The cat has already be caught sleeping in the crib. Any advise would be greatly appricated.
post #2 of 14
Here's a good link at the Humane Society for information: http://www.hsus.org/pets/pet_care/in..._new_baby.html

There have been many stories about kitties readily accepting the new baby - and being very protective of it. If they're concerned about the kitty in the crib, perhaps the door to baby's room should be kept closed and kitty not allowed in there?

Otherwise, I think it very unlikely that kitty would do anything to hurt the baby intentionally. Might be warm and snuggly for both of them!



Laurie
post #3 of 14
I will try to find the link, but I read somewhere that before the baby is born you should put cans filled with beans, or other unpleasent stuff in the crib so that the cat learns before not to jump in the baby's crib. Closing the door wont help because when the baby is born the door will need to be left open.

Also, they need to get him used to a baby crying. Have them wrap a doll in a blanket, and train the cat not to be too inquisitive around the baby (i.e. pawing, hissing, or just wanting to lay on top of the doll)

When she gives birth have her SO bring a blanket with babys scent home so the cat knows what to expect before the baby comes home. I hope this helps just a tad bit!
post #4 of 14
I've always believed that people over-react to cats and new babies. With baby monitors so available these days, there is no reason the baby's door cannot be closed.

When we brought our daughter home, I had a 10 yr. old Siamese that was MY cat and only MY cat. All the good-intentioned folks told me I would have to "get rid" of my little Siamese girl. That was not an option for me since she was very, very special to me then and still is today even though she is over the rainbow bridge waiting for me. When I breast-fed Jennifer, I allowed my cat to be on my lap at the same time since she always sat on my lap when I sat down. I always made sure she got attention and didn't feel like I was pushing her aside for the baby. As Jennifer grew and started crawling, that cat was absolutely wonderful with her. She never once bit or scratched the baby. In fact she would take a swipe at my mom if she sat down too close to her, but she allowed Jennifer to pull on her tail and her ears and never once hurt her. Naturally I kept an eye on them so that if Jen did get near the cat, I didn't let her hurt the cat either - Jen needed to be taught how to treat the kitty as well.

Jennifer's first word was not daddy or momma - it was "seesuz" - the cat's name was Susie.

IMO, not being stressed around either the cat or the baby is better for everyone involved - babies and cats will pick up on the mom's stress.
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
I've always believed that people over-react to cats and new babies. With baby monitors so available these days, there is no reason the baby's door cannot be closed.

When we brought our daughter home, I had a 10 yr. old Siamese that was MY cat and only MY cat. All the good-intentioned folks told me I would have to "get rid" of my little Siamese girl. That was not an option for me since she was very, very special to me then and still is today even though she is over the rainbow bridge waiting for me. When I breast-fed Jennifer, I allowed my cat to be on my lap at the same time since she always sat on my lap when I sat down. I always made sure she got attention and didn't feel like I was pushing her aside for the baby. As Jennifer grew and started crawling, that cat was absolutely wonderful with her. She never once bit or scratched the baby. In fact she would take a swipe at my mom if she sat down too close to her, but she allowed Jennifer to pull on her tail and her ears and never once hurt her. Naturally I kept an eye on them so that if Jen did get near the cat, I didn't let her hurt the cat either - Jen needed to be taught how to treat the kitty as well.

Jennifer's first word was not daddy or momma - it was "seesuz" - the cat's name was Susie.

IMO, not being stressed around either the cat or the baby is better for everyone involved - babies and cats will pick up on the mom's stress.
This was a wonderful post, I wonder if it works the same way with dogs. I don't want my two "grandpuppies" to be upset when my real grandbaby gets here.
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
I've always believed that people over-react to cats and new babies. With baby monitors so available these days, there is no reason the baby's door cannot be closed.

When we brought our daughter home, I had a 10 yr. old Siamese that was MY cat and only MY cat. All the good-intentioned folks told me I would have to "get rid" of my little Siamese girl. That was not an option for me since she was very, very special to me then and still is today even though she is over the rainbow bridge waiting for me. When I breast-fed Jennifer, I allowed my cat to be on my lap at the same time since she always sat on my lap when I sat down. I always made sure she got attention and didn't feel like I was pushing her aside for the baby. As Jennifer grew and started crawling, that cat was absolutely wonderful with her. She never once bit or scratched the baby. In fact she would take a swipe at my mom if she sat down too close to her, but she allowed Jennifer to pull on her tail and her ears and never once hurt her. Naturally I kept an eye on them so that if Jen did get near the cat, I didn't let her hurt the cat either - Jen needed to be taught how to treat the kitty as well.

Jennifer's first word was not daddy or momma - it was "seesuz" - the cat's name was Susie.

IMO, not being stressed around either the cat or the baby is better for everyone involved - babies and cats will pick up on the mom's stress.
I'm glad you refused to give up your kitty and it worked out so well! WHAT a sweet story!

Laurie
post #7 of 14
Friends of ours got a cover for the new baby's crib that prevented the cat from jumping in there with him. Mostly I'd be worried about the cat waking up the baby, considering those little guys can be hard enough to get to sleep as it is.

Personally, I would not be worried about the cat and the baby. There are plenty of websites that explain ways for the two to coexist peacefully, I searched "cat new baby" and found lots of hits.

If it were me, I'd take some precautions before the little one arrives to be sure that everyone will be safe and sound. Take the cat for a check-up and be sure that her shots are up to date. If if is an indoor-only cat, have her claws clipped (or do it yourself), to prevent any scratching accidents. My cats know not to scratch people, but we end up with the occasional scrape due to them falling off a leg or miscalculating a jump. No one wants their new baby to get a scratch!

Urge your sister not to get rid of her cat! At least give the cat a chance to get along with the child. As the previous poster has said, it's such a wonderful thing for a child to grow up with animals. It teaches them love and compassion for living things, and animals love kids too!

My favourite blogger posted a video of her son with their two dogs. It always makes me smile!
post #8 of 14
We just kept the door closed, before and after our baby got here, and we have 4 cats that were all here first. They were a little hacked at first that the baby wasn't going "home" , from anywhere from a week to a month (depending on the cat), but they didn't mind or bother her- they were just miffed at me! Eventually, they decided that it was nice to share mommy's lap with the baby during feeding and nap times and the oldest one (Bird) would come and look and squawk at me like "Don't you hear that baby crying? You can do better than that! Follow me!" "Bird, She just woke up; I'll get her when I get out of the bathroom..." .

It wasn't really a big adjustment for them or us, as far as the cats went.
post #9 of 14
I hate to play devil's advocate, and of course I don't think the cat should be given up, but... I do think every precaution should be taken.

I feel this way because of a darling little boy I once saw in a grocery store. He was perhaps 18 months old, a sweet, happy child... but his whole head and face were covered with long, thin scars, and one nostril was torn and deformed. I was so shocked that I couldn't cover my reaction, so I just said to the mother, "I'm so sorry! What happened?" And she said it was a cat.

The point is that babies are so very delicate that monstrous damage can be done in mere seconds. This means the stakes are just too high to place COMPLETE trust in any animal, no matter how familiar and beloved it may be.

One thing that might help is a screen door on the baby's room -- it would allow air circulation, make it easy to look in on the baby without the snick of a doorlatch to wake him, and yet keep the kitty safely away. (Actually, you might want glass in the lower part of the door, so the kitty won't be tempted to claw and climb it.)

Just a thought. All good wishes...
post #10 of 14
That's very true. No child who is too young to understand how to treat an animal (no matter how "trustworthy" the animal) should be near them, without an adult literally "holding their hands". It happens enough when you are trying to be super vigilant, especially when your child gets older , let alone when you aren't trying to make a habit of being that way .

I guess I should have included that I knew how my cats (and dog) felt about children, from babies to older kids, from a parade of nieces, nephews and friends' kids being in our house for the 10 years before we had our own.

Remember to have someone bring home a blanket or something that smells like the baby (and the weird hospital smells )and let the cat investigate it before you bring the baby home- then the baby won't be a totally new smell on homecoming day .
post #11 of 14
What a great, helpful thread. I'm not pregnant, but hope to be in the next couple of years. This is great advice that I'll be sure to come back to in the future. I've had thoughts and concerns about how a new baby might go over in our house so the responses here have been very reassuring.
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by JulieKit View Post
Closing the door wont help because when the baby is born the door will need to be left open.
Why? or do you just mean in your case?

Just shut the door, no reason for it to be open unless you don't have a baby monitor, but those things are not expensive. Just buy one and keep the door shut, problem solved

But if you need to have the door open for some reason, crib covers work.
post #13 of 14
Our daughter's grandma bought us this crib tent because she was terrified of our cats hurting the baby. It was completely unnecessary, because our kitties wouldn't go anywhere near our baby.

http://www.babysafehome.com/store/pr...php?prodid=165
post #14 of 14
I too am almost 7 months pregnant with our first child and have had the same worries about our new daughter when she gets here-I also have 8 kitties who are all very affectionate with my husband and I. Our siamese Ginger is the one I worry about the most because of her curiosity and her affectionate nature-she loves babies! I have already put up our crib and am in the process of teaching them that the crib is off limits-I have only had it up 2 days now and so far they really are not even interested in the thing. I sure that will change once it smells like milk, but I also too believe that that is what they make baby monitors for. I would NEVER give up any of my cats just because of a baby-unless horrible allergies occur (which heaven forbid she should have any!!!!!!!!) Even then I will figure out a way to make us all coexist together! I too have also contimplated the idea of the crib tent-that way there is no chance of kitties getting in the crib or baby getting out! Good luck with your new niece or nephew and tell your sister what is going to happen will happen no matter what so she should not spend too much time worrying over it-she does not need that kind of stress right now!
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