TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › The Cat Lounge › Organic fruits and veges
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Organic fruits and veges

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Just recently we've been buying alot of organic fruits and veg. (see my porkchop thread last night for reasons why).
I must say there really is a big difference. The pears were the tastiest pears ever, same goes for the apples. The tomatos taste like the ones that we used to pick from my grandmother's garden, so flavourful. The avacados are almost sweet. No bitterness.
More expensive, but worth it.
post #2 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred&Nermal View Post
Just recently we've been buying alot of organic fruits and veg. (see my porkchop thread last night for reasons why).
I must say there really is a big difference. The pears were the tastiest pears ever, same goes for the apples. The tomatos taste like the ones that we used to pick from my grandmother's garden, so flavourful. The avacados are almost sweet. No bitterness.
More expensive, but worth it.
I agree... DH and I have been buying Organic for three years now, and I won't go back.
post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 
I'm thinking of getting the service where they deliver it to your door twice a month. Unfortunately, with our cold weather the veges will freeze outside if I'm not there to receive them.
The cost works out better with this delivery service, I am told.
post #4 of 23
We've been buying organic or growing our own for years, the taste is so much better.
post #5 of 23
Is there bugs in them though? That what I am afraid of
post #6 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trouts mom View Post
Is there bugs in them though? That what I am afraid of
I haven't seen a bug yet. If you buy them at the store you can look for yourself. Friends who have done the delivery service have not complained of bugs. Maybe more earth-dirt. The plus to the lack of pesticide is when you rinse the fruit, you are only rinsing off soil dirt (if present) not pesticide chemicals.
The taste difference is quite dramatic. Makes you realize what fruit/veges are really supposed to taste like.
post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trouts mom View Post
Is there bugs in them though? That what I am afraid of
Organic veggies and fruits are sprayed for pests too. The only difference, the sprays have to be "organic". Pretty sure that was discussed a bit in a IMO thread, so that's a matter better left for there.
In summer I prefer stuff from my in-laws garden, nothing at all is sprayed on them.
post #8 of 23
Yes its true organic products can be treated with organic products. For instance on potatoes BT (bacillus thuringensis) is used to control potato beetle / These beetles do not feed on the potato but the plant itself. Some produce with thick skins such as bananas -the pesticide does not penetrate the banana peel (which is discarded anyhow). I would rather grow my own or go to a farmers market as the quality is really good and you can asked how produced is raised. Another way of obtaining good untreated produce is through a a food coop whereas a farmer will grow and guarantee a certain amt of fresh produce to their clients.
post #9 of 23
I saw on tv that there is a list somewhere of fruits and veggies and how much they are affected by pesticides (how much of it you get, if I remember right). Some (like the bananas that were mentioned) were okay not to buy organic, and others you were better off buying organic, but I couldn't find it. Has anyone else heard about this list? In the summer I grow some of my own veggies in pots on the backporch, but I'd really like to know what's on this list .
post #10 of 23
I love organic fruit and vegies. Grass fed meat, chease and free range eggs are better too. I think alot of it is psycalogical. I know people who don't notice a differance at all. I al so try to buy foods that are perpackaged and made with organic ingrediance.
post #11 of 23
The food list you are taking about was in the Wall Street Journal fairly recently.
post #12 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by strange_wings View Post
Organic veggies and fruits are sprayed for pests too. The only difference, the sprays have to be "organic". Pretty sure that was discussed a bit in a IMO thread, so that's a matter better left for there.
In summer I prefer stuff from my in-laws garden, nothing at all is sprayed on them.
I would like to do the same. But with amount of animals in my city backyard the urine spray turns me off. There are Possums, Racoons, squirrels, tons of cats (feral and outdoor cats). I have tried, but all the stuff ends up half chewed on the ground.

I SWEAR there is a taste difference with the fruit especially.
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by GailC View Post
The food list you are taking about was in the Wall Street Journal fairly recently.
Thanks! I'll see if I can find it online there .
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by catsallover View Post
I saw on tv that there is a list somewhere of fruits and veggies and how much they are affected by pesticides (how much of it you get, if I remember right). Some (like the bananas that were mentioned) were okay not to buy organic, and others you were better off buying organic, but I couldn't find it. Has anyone else heard about this list? In the summer I grow some of my own veggies in pots on the backporch, but I'd really like to know what's on this list .
Consumer reports I've seen in the past state that strawberrys are affected the worst by pesticides. Easy to see why. Bell peppers high on the list, too.
post #15 of 23
I've tried both organic and non-organic. I can't taste a difference. I will say- the grocery store i work at (i run the floral dpt. but help cashier when they need me) just took out a new line of organic stuff "Full Circle" and is making a fortune....i think for many people it's a psychological thing. They think that if they eat organice it's healthy and fat free....but alot of times they don't look at what's actually in it (i'm talking about things other than fruits and veggies too). When i have time/space i grow some of my own things. but personally i think some of the organic things seem to be a fad...and since i'm actually working in a retail chain that sells the stuff- i can see the massive profit that's going into their wallets by ripping peple off They make a fortune off the organic stuff...just like they did when Adkins and things like that were popular.It's definitely interesting to see a different side of the "organic" profit that most consumers don't get to see. /(no offense to anyone by the way- just my personal opinion.).
post #16 of 23
Organic does taste better ... But my garden ganics are the BEST ...
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarryEyedTiGeR View Post
I've tried both organic and non-organic. I can't taste a difference. I will say- the grocery store i work at (i run the floral dpt. but help cashier when they need me) just took out a new line of organic stuff "Full Circle" and is making a fortune....i think for many people it's a psychological thing. They think that if they eat organice it's healthy and fat free....but alot of times they don't look at what's actually in it (i'm talking about things other than fruits and veggies too). When i have time/space i grow some of my own things. but personally i think some of the organic things seem to be a fad...and since i'm actually working in a retail chain that sells the stuff- i can see the massive profit that's going into their wallets by ripping peple off They make a fortune off the organic stuff...just like they did when Adkins and things like that were popular.It's definitely interesting to see a different side of the "organic" profit that most consumers don't get to see. /(no offense to anyone by the way- just my personal opinion.).
I've often wondered if some stores just stick an organic lable on some and mark them up. Used to be you could trust a certain health food stor to look out for consumers on those issues but since they went public, they've turned into a super market in my area.
Home grown is the only way to be sure.
post #18 of 23
I guess organic costs more because there is more loss and damage due to lack of chemical use, and not enough demand. If everyone would just buy something organic, whatever they can afford, every week, we could support the organic growing farmers, increase the amount purchased, and thus lower the price.
They have organic methods of controlling pests, etc.
they use better soil, no chemicals, the way it is meant to be, but with mass production, organic is more difficult I imagine. But if the whole farming industry would go organic, I am sure there would be major breakthroughs on how to mass produce organic produce.
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by gailuvscats View Post
I guess organic costs more because there is more loss and damage due to lack of chemical use, and not enough demand. If everyone would just buy something organic, whatever they can afford, every week, we could support the organic growing farmers, increase the amount purchased, and thus lower the price.
They have organic methods of controlling pests, etc.
they use better soil, no chemicals, the way it is meant to be, but with mass production, organic is more difficult I imagine. But if the whole farming industry would go organic, I am sure there would be major breakthroughs on how to mass produce organic produce.
Actually, that's the trend in Germany now.

I agree that organic fruit and vegetables taste much better than the mass-produced stuff, which is often transported long distances, too. My husband is "into" gardening, and has a greenhouse and an orchard, and rents a field outside of our town. The produce may not be as "pretty" as what you get in a normal supermarket, and there's a lot of loss to pests, but the taste is so much better.
We also buy "organic" meat and dairy products, and eggs from free-ranging hens only. Luckily, there are local producers (farmers) with their own shops, or who supply local butchers, etc..
post #20 of 23
I love organics...the absolute best is when you can go to farmer's markets in the spring, summer and fall and buy and use only in-season veggies (you then are forced to use your imagination on dishes!) and you can meet your farmer.

However, in the perma-frost, it's off to Whole Paycheck...i mean...Foods. Whole FOODS.
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by lionessrampant View Post
However, in the perma-frost, it's off to Whole Paycheck...i mean...Foods. Whole FOODS.
Do you have a decent-sized freezer? Or is the difference in price in winter enough to warrant the purchase of one? Lots of fruits and vegetables can be frozen when they're in season, and others, like potatoes and onions, can be stored in a cellar for months. I haven't gotten into "canning" stuff, though we "juice" and bottle tomatoes.
post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat View Post
Do you have a decent-sized freezer? Or is the difference in price in winter enough to warrant the purchase of one? Lots of fruits and vegetables can be frozen when they're in season, and others, like potatoes and onions, can be stored in a cellar for months. I haven't gotten into "canning" stuff, though we "juice" and bottle tomatoes.
I have a small freezer, too bad it's not a functional one! I freeze herbs and use a cooler on my porch to freeze things in weather like this as well. I haven't been that excited about the results when using frozen veggies, however. But these are store-bought ones
post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by lionessrampant View Post
I have a small freezer, too bad it's not a functional one! I freeze herbs and use a cooler on my porch to freeze things in weather like this as well. I haven't been that excited about the results when using frozen veggies, however. But these are store-bought ones
You really need a decent, functional freezer to get good results, but it's usually only worthwhile if you're preparing meals for two or more people every day. Some day! Do you have a list of "seasonal veggies" for your area?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: The Cat Lounge
TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › The Cat Lounge › Organic fruits and veges