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What do I do with Trout when I go away??

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
Now that my landlord will be moving out..(she used to check in on Trout when I was away) What will I do with her when I'm gone?

I am planning a trip in April and as well one in August..Both times I will be gone a week..And I literally have NOONE to watch Trout. She is a very high stress cat and a boarding place would NOT be good for her..But How can I trust a catsitter that I don't really know?

I am so worried about this..I am thinking of asking my ex to care for her. I completely trust him and I know he would take good care of her. I just don't know if he'd even say yes to caring for her though..

What else can I even do?
post #2 of 27
well since there is no one else.. perhaps you can look around your area for a pet boarding place that is more of those resorts for animals. Instead of boarding her at a vet clinic where they don't usually pay any attention to the animals, you could board her at like an "animal resort". They are just now starting to pop up around my area and maybe there are some near you. I have heard good things so far about the ones in my town. THey seem to create a "house-like' atmosphere for the dogs and cats. They get plenty of play time and attention and they are kept in nice rooms or pens. Anyway, thats just a thought. I think its kind of pricey though. Anyway, I hope you figure out something soon. Good luck
post #3 of 27
There is a boarding place by my work that is also part-rescue and store.

They allow the cats to roam around the store most of the time. Often times when I go in there I see a cat "sampling" one of many things they sell (a bed, toys, etc). All the cats seem to be really relaxed. See if there is one in your neighborhood.

Otherwise ask around work and see if someone used a pet-sitting service before.
post #4 of 27
Check with your VET if he can recommend a pet sitter - mine does!
post #5 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trouts mom View Post
I am thinking of asking my ex to care for her. I completely trust him and I know he would take good care of her.
Woah! This is the guy that would do mean things to Trout, right? I remember a thread you started about that.
post #6 of 27
I would definitely not recommend boarding. Most cats don't do well with it.

I'd recommend talking with your vet's office. They will likely either have a service they recommend or you'll find out that one of the techs/receptionists/assistants petsits in their off time to earn a little extra $. I think this is your best bet.
post #7 of 27
Nat, I'd recommend the petsitter route. For years, we had friends or family come in to take care of cat(s) when we were away. Latterly, "friends or family" had become Rob's son -- he being the only person living close enough to impose upon. But his life is changing, and last year when we knew we would have several absences of more than a couple of days, we realized that it would be unfair to expect him to cover for all of it, and started looking at options. The upshot was that we interviewed some petsitters -- only one actually in our home, as she was the one that stood out for us.

Check this site for some guidance in finding one. Also have a look at this one. That was the one I approached first, because I really liked the look of the operation, but I didn't expect her to take us on, because I was pretty sure we were out of her area. However, she did have a recommendation for us, and that woman turned out to be our sitter. There are minor variations in how they operate, but that site is a good indicator of what you can expect.

We've been totally happy with this arrangement. We know the kids are well looked after, so we can spend all our away-from-the-kids-angst on missing them -- not on worrying about them. And it's not even expensive!

I really didn't want to think of boarding them, and subjecting them to the travel and strange surroundings, and I simply won't now.

Good luck!
post #8 of 27
If your ex is a trustable person and you still get along I would ask him. Or start interviewing catsitters as soon as possible.
I don't like boarding animals I boarded Duke when he was younger and he came home with and eye infection and scratch marks averwhere. I also wouldn't trust a compleet stranger so right now it sounds like your ex might be the safe choice
post #9 of 27
I'm assuming you live in the Toronto area because you mentioned the Raptors. I went away for work all summer last year and used a cat sitter called "The cat's pyjamas". They were excellent. It was about $17 a visit. They will feed cats, clean litter boxes, play with cats, administer medecine if requested or take cats to the vet in an emergency. They also offer a cat hotel at Shepherd and Yonge. I will send you a PM with the owner's email, but I will give you their web link here.

http://www.thecatspyjamas.ca/
post #10 of 27
I would never board my cats. I just know they'd be COMPLETELY freaked out.
I'd say your best bet is a pet sitter or do you have any neighbors that you trust?
post #11 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hydroaxe View Post
Woah! This is the guy that would do mean things to Trout, right? I remember a thread you started about that.
Well he did love Trout, he just thought it was funny to push her of things while she slept I'm certain he wouldn't do that if he was just popping in to check on her and feed her/clean the lb. He would never hurt her and I know that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by semiferal View Post
I would definitely not recommend boarding. Most cats don't do well with it.

I'd recommend talking with your vet's office. They will likely either have a service they recommend or you'll find out that one of the techs/receptionists/assistants petsits in their off time to earn a little extra $. I think this is your best bet.
I will ask my vet offce, I really can't board her, she would be a wreck, and I would just worry about her the whole time I was gone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rapunzel47 View Post
Nat, I'd recommend the petsitter route. For years, we had friends or family come in to take care of cat(s) when we were away. Latterly, "friends or family" had become Rob's son -- he being the only person living close enough to impose upon. But his life is changing, and last year when we knew we would have several absences of more than a couple of days, we realized that it would be unfair to expect him to cover for all of it, and started looking at options. The upshot was that we interviewed some petsitters -- only one actually in our home, as she was the one that stood out for us.

Check this site for some guidance in finding one. Also have a look at this one. That was the one I approached first, because I really liked the look of the operation, but I didn't expect her to take us on, because I was pretty sure we were out of her area. However, she did have a recommendation for us, and that woman turned out to be our sitter. There are minor variations in how they operate, but that site is a good indicator of what you can expect.

We've been totally happy with this arrangement. We know the kids are well looked after, so we can spend all our away-from-the-kids-angst on missing them -- not on worrying about them. And it's not even expensive!

I really didn't want to think of boarding them, and subjecting them to the travel and strange surroundings, and I simply won't now.

Good luck!
Thanks so much for the links!! I can't board Trout either..she would lose her mind for sure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sicycat View Post
I would never board my cats. I just know they'd be COMPLETELY freaked out.
I'd say your best bet is a pet sitter or do you have any neighbors that you trust?
Thats the thing, I don't know anyone in London, and all my coworkers live far away, so they wouldn't want to do it.

I just don't see how I could trust a petsitter coming into my home..After an interview how can you trust a complete stranger? Maybe they just act nice, but really are meanies or thieves??
post #12 of 27
Your vet may be able to recommend someone that pet sits that he/she knows is trustworthy, or could your sister take her for the week?
post #13 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by icklemiss21 View Post
Your vet may be able to recommend someone that pet sits that he/she knows is trustworthy, or could your sister take her for the week?
My sister couldn't for 2 reasons..Trout shouldn't be put in another house..she will die of fright..and also, my 2 young nieces galavanting around will cause Trout to die of a fear coronary.
post #14 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trouts mom View Post
I just don't see how I could trust a pet sitter coming into my home..After an interview how can you trust a complete stranger? Maybe they just act nice, but really are meanies or thieves??
That's when you rely on your vet and lots of written recommendations from the pet sitter.

I called two or three of the recommendations that my pet sitter provided and received very high praises from these people. I was very totally satisfied and I also had a web cam set up in the house that I was able to check in daily to see my babies. I did let my sitter know that I set up the web cam too.
post #15 of 27
I would look around for a pet sitter. You can be pushy about checking references. I'd invite them into your home & see how they do around Trout, etc. before leaving her with them.
post #16 of 27
Do you have a company called "CritterSitters" in your area? There is a chain down here with wonderful people that will come several times a day to feed and check on your animals. We've used them twice and were VERY VERY VERY happy with them. They took excellent care of my kitties (the dog was kenneled at the vet because she had surgery at the time and it was before we had our rabbit) and she ever fed and cleaned out our fish and my bettas for us at no charge. Everyday she left little notes about what she did and how the animals were acting....she also called us to check in too. She was excellent. We've hired a crittersitter person everytime we've gone out of town for quite a while now when family members are unable to help. They are great- nothing but good experiences with them / Also- what we did is before we agreed to anything -we set up an interview with the individual- got to meet them and let them see our animals/house showed them where the food and all was. So before we ever hired them- we interviewed them. We also obtained the names and numbers of several of their references and people they worked for in the past and we checked all of them. I'd suggest doing this. Also- the prices were not bad at all!!!!!!!!
post #17 of 27
You can check them out and make sure they are licensed, also ask for references and call these referred people and see what they have to say. At least then your kitty would be able to stay in his home home which is the best thing for them. I hope you find an answer...
post #18 of 27
Thread Starter 
Well, I looked up petsitting in the phonebook and found a bunch of different ones..So what questions should I ask when I call? Can they actually have licenses?
post #19 of 27
I am not sure about licenses but you may find one that is bonded (criminal record check and insurance should they cause damage to your place etc) that would be my first choice if they didn't come with a recommendation.

My vet also has a list of reliable pet sitters (people she deals with all the time and the vet tech there will also pet sit if the cat needs medical attention (we had her come and give Scully insulin when we were away and he needed it) even though we had friends looking after the cats in general
post #20 of 27
I would recommend a sitter. My kitties are MUCh less stressed if I have someone come here, versus bringing them somewhere.
post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trouts mom View Post
Well, I looked up petsitting in the phonebook and found a bunch of different ones..So what questions should I ask when I call? Can they actually have licenses?
All of the good ones around here say "licensed, bonded and insured". I'm not 100% sure what that means, but you for sure want to make sure they have insurance I would think.

I'd also make sure the person has a back up plan in case they are sick or have an emergency and that they're willing to come a) at the same time of day each day and b) are willing to get Trout to the vet in an emergency. Have them come over once before so that you can physically show them everything. Most will also offer to get your mail and generally make it look like someone's been home.
post #22 of 27
I co-owned a pet sitting business with my Mother which she still owns and runs down in Florida for almost 4 years. Make sure it isn't a fly by night kind of deal. Any professional pet sitter is and should be bonded and insured. Make sure you give the pet sitter plenty of advance notice, if you are going away in April I believe you said, that is plenty of time.

A professional pet sitter will come to your home for an initial interview. This is normal and you want to know who is going to be in your home. You want to see how your animal reacts to them as well. They should also have a list of references on hand. They will also have you sign a contract more than likely, which is standard. I can give you a few pointers to help you along in your decision.

First off, choose someone who either has no employees or it is family owned and operated if at all possible. This is how my Mother and I run the company and we take huge pride in the fact we are animal lovers and we will always know that no funny business will be going on in your home. You take a risk with hiring employees, and being in someone elses home is something we take seriously. I have heard of some horror stories which I won't go into detail on here to scare you off, but lets just say that if you need to interview several people until you feel comfortable with one, then do it.

Don't get overly paranoid about hiring a pet sitter. For most of us, this is our fulltime job! We do it with pride because we love what we do. Pet sitters don't snoop through your house, they do their job and spend time with your animals. We can also perform several other tasks like bringing in your mail, watering your plants, rotating blinds and turning lights on and off so people won't suspect you are not home. My Mother has several clients she actually does overnights for in their homes!

A pet sitter will usually spend 30 minutes or more visiting and playing with your animal. For cats this can sometimes mean just sitting on the couch with them watching the TV and petting them, so make sure that you let the sitter know your cats routines. Leave detailed instructions written out on paper for your sitter and all the treats, litter, food, dishes etc that your cat will use during the time you are away. Even if your cat is very shy (which is common!) and the sitter won't even see him or her, it is a much better route than boarding an animal. Less stress and no chance of catching an illness.

Here is a website that can help you locate some petsitters in your area Pet Sitters International

If you have any questions please feel free to send me a PM, I am more than happy to discuss any concerns you might have if you choose to go this route for your baby.
post #23 of 27
When I needed a catsitter, I called my vet for recommendations. The woman who now takes care of my cats (Judy) came over well before I had to leave, to meet Ivo (an only cat at the time). I took into account not only the references she provided and the fact that she was bonded, but also how Ivo took to her. And when I adopted Gypsy, Judy came by to meet her, too.

Before I left for Christmas, Judy had a family emergency that meant she would not be taking care of the girls the whole time. She brought over the woman who would be filling in for her, along with her references. I appreciated Judy's transparency about her situation, along with her willingness to introduce me and the girls to her replacement. Judy always leaves a note to tell me how the girls did, along with any potential problems. I've been nothing but happy with her care of the girls.
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by okeefecl View Post
Judy always leaves a note to tell me how the girls did, along with any potential problems. I've been nothing but happy with her care of the girls.
We always leave a "pet report card" after each and every visit, telling you what we did, what the pet did, if there were any accidents or unusual behaviour etc. It is not only nice for the pet owner to see when they get home, but is a great way for us to keep track of the animals we sit for as we keep a final copy of it after each job is over.
post #25 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Butterflyy View Post
We always leave a "pet report card" after each and every visit, telling you what we did, what the pet did, if there were any accidents or unusual behaviour etc. It is not only nice for the pet owner to see when they get home, but is a great way for us to keep track of the animals we sit for as we keep a final copy of it after each job is over.
Yep, our sitter does that. Debbie's great. She and Fawn are getting along great guns, and the last couple of times, Cindy was being more visible, more interested in coming out for treats, and not hiding the whole time. Suzy still hasn't showed her face, and given her reclusive nature with EVERYONE, if Debbie ever sees her that will be a miracle.
post #26 of 27
I would ask my vet if they knew someone who did stuff like that, and if that didn't work out, I would definately ask my ex. You know that he loves Trout and he would take good care of her.
post #27 of 27
Thread Starter 
Well, I have emailed the ex..Lets keep our fingers crossed that he says yes

There is a good chance he might not because he has a problem seeing me still..he was still very much in love when I broke up with him. I hope he doesn't let that affect his decision to help me out.
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