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Should cats be treated differently than dogs??

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
It's an interesting discussion on Petfinder right now and is 10 pages long....

http://forums.petfinder.com/viewtopi...7289&start=135

When people see an outdoor stray dog or pack of stray dogs..they are encouraged to bring them to the shelter. But with cats..the recommendation is to trap, neuter and then return them. There are some people who have expressed that this treatment of outdoor cats encourages individuals to not consider cats as indoor pets and to dump cats. Feel free to post your opinion here or in the Petfinder discussion.

Katie
post #2 of 18
I think the only reason dogs are brought to the shelter is because they are much more of a nuisance running in packs than cats are in colonies. At least, that seems to be what people think! More people want dogs. Cats are "dirty, gross, anti-social". Cats seem to have a bad reputation whereas dogs are "mans best friend". Also, I know of one guy who owns a cat. He is frequently called "gay-wad", etc. He is insulted that he is gay simply for the fact that he owns a cat!

I can understand TNR for feral cats. I've never encountered a pack of feral dogs, though. I think they all deserve a chance at being housepets-whether a dog or a cat doesn't matter!
post #3 of 18
Yes they should be treated the same. Cats are as much of a nuisance as dogs. We use to have ferals living behind us. They always got into our trash and was mating on our porch! No one wants to see that. And hear all those mating calls.
post #4 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SalemWitchChild View Post
Yes they should be treated the same. Cats are as much of a nuisance as dogs. We use to have ferals living behind us. They always got into our trash and was mating on our porch! No one wants to see that. And hear all those mating calls.
Interesting...."use to" indicates to me that you no longer have them around. And did anyone ever approach you about having them TNRed so that they would be sterilized?? I believe that would have solved the issue regarding the cat calls.

Katie
post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by TNR1 View Post
Interesting...."use to" indicates to me that you no longer have them around. And did anyone ever approach you about having them TNRed so that they would be sterilized?? I believe that would have solved the issue regarding the cat calls.

Katie

Use to means I no longer live there. And we do not have a sterilize and release program here. If ferals are caught they are euthanized. Unless they are babies and can be made into house cats.
post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SalemWitchChild View Post
Use to means I no longer live there. And we do not have a sterilize and release program here. If ferals are caught they are euthanized. Unless they are babies and can be made into house cats.
Personally, I think it's a shame....I've been very active in TNR for over 3 years and have seen the positive outcomes from having a TNRed colony. Perhaps at some point, a TNR group will be established where you are since I've seen lots more TNR groups popping up all over.

Katie
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by TNR1 View Post
Personally, I think it's a shame....I've been very active in TNR for over 3 years and have seen the positive outcomes from having a TNRed colony. Perhaps at some point, a TNR group will be established where you are since I've seen lots more TNR groups popping up all over.

Katie

I personally don't think that will happen here. And I wouldn't want it to. Unless they were in the country. They may not be able to breed but that doesn't solve the problem of them running out in traffic or getting into trash.
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by TNR1 View Post
Personally, I think it's a shame....I've been very active in TNR for over 3 years and have seen the positive outcomes from having a TNRed colony. Perhaps at some point, a TNR group will be established where you are since I've seen lots more TNR groups popping up all over.

Katie
I really hope a TNR program pops up here. I know of many farmers who feed/water feral colonies, but simply cannot afford to fix them all. Many are starting with the females, doing as many at a time as they can! Every bit helps, I guess. But, if that was a dog, they would end up in the shelter.
post #9 of 18
I think people perceive dogs as being much more of a liability than cats. Cats are thought to be reclusive and anti-social whereas dogs are generally associated with attacking children and giving them rabies or whatever it is the general public believes. I think this is pretty ingrained on people. Could it also have anything to do with the rate at which cats reproduce? Or the number of feral cats compared to feral dogs? I'd be interested to see those numbers. Admittedly, I know nothing about dogs or how the issue of feral dogs is generally addressed.

Are there any groups that actively TNR dogs?

Also, what about the issue of how terrified barn/feral cats are of people? Sometimes, it is EXTREMELY stressful for them to be go through the socialization process and would just as soon go on living outside happily. Perhaps, for many of these cats, having food, shelter, vaccs, neutering and the watchful eye of a caretaker MIGHT just be the best road, at least until more people are willing to be educated about how to properly care for cats they can't ever touch. Either that or a sanctuary that specializes in feral cat caretaking and can give them the above, but those are few and far between. Obviously, some will come around...but unfortunately some never will.
post #10 of 18
jsut a side note, I believe there is actually a pack of feral dogs in the Cleveland area, might be down in University Hts? but anyway, they haven't been able to catch them and I guess they have actually attacked people. But no, I don't think cats and dogs should be treated the same, IMO cats are much better at surviving on their own then dogs, dogs are very dependent on their humans and they usually do not do well when dumped and left to fend for themselves, cats on the other hand, seem to be able to adapt a little better. I also think TNR is a great thing
post #11 of 18
I agree with Lionsrampant.

Cats are much more anti-social in general. My parents are currently feeding some feral cats (I call them neighborhood cats since they live in a subdivision...they HAVE to be someone elses cats) on their deck.

The instant you even attempt to approach them from behind a CLOSED DOOR, they run off. If you open the door they run further. Hence the term "Fraidy Cat".

Dogs are more likely to approach a person. If its acting rabid, then yes, you may still want to cage it.

Wai-wai-wait...Do they MAKE trap cages for dogs? Some dogs are HUGE...if its a Chiuahua, that's one thing, but a big huge Labrador or Great Dane...????
post #12 of 18
Of everyone in my husbands side of the family we are the only ones with cats.
Lots of them just tolerate them when they come to visit. On the other hand a couple of them have dogs but they are not "indoor" dogs.
Alot of perceptions seem to come from how people were raised. If you were not raised with cats in the house-you aren't going to get a cat as a pet. Funny thing is that I have never really questioned why they don't like cats-I should do this soon though.
Many times people think that dogs have a purpose ie hunting that rationalizes them having one.
post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SalemWitchChild View Post
I personally don't think that will happen here. And I wouldn't want it to. Unless they were in the country. They may not be able to breed but that doesn't solve the problem of them running out in traffic or getting into trash.
If they are properly fed..there is no reason to have to dig in the trash. And if a trash receptacle is properly contained, then no wildlife or cats should be able to get inside. As far as running into traffic..there is an interesting article by Animal People that suggests that roadkills of cats has fallen by 90% in the last 10 years due to TNR:

http://www.animalpeoplenews.org/03/1...kills1103.html

What I find fascinating is when people judge how to treat these cats based on situations that were not properly managed in the past. I.E. if the person's experience of outdoor cats was one of cats rooting around trashcans and catawalling (due to not being fixed) and being run over (due to roaming because they are not fixed) without any proper TNR program....TNR is not considered a viable option. However, when TNR is established...it often changes the mentality of how people perceive the relationship with outdoor cats. When these cats can no longer add to the overpopulation and due tend to stick around because 1. they don't need to root for food anymore and 2. they don't have their hormones dictating their behavior...it does provide an alternative to euthanization. BTW...I know plenty of well managed urban colonies...so the whole...'only in the county' perception is truthfully a myth.

Katie
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by TNR1 View Post
BTW...I know plenty of well managed urban colonies...so the whole...'only in the county' perception is truthfully a myth.
I work in a major German city (population >600,000) which has a number of cat colonies well maintained by volunteers. Jamie's father lives at one, and his mother was trapped at the same colony. She was spayed after having her litter, but not returned, as she was socialized; his father is still unneutered, since he's too wily for traps. TNR has been practiced in that city since 1982, with good results. Any colony growth is due to people dumping unspeutered cats. Euthanasia is forbidden for any reason other than a grave medical one all over the country.
post #15 of 18
I would certainly call myself a dog lover, but I would not be in favor of TNR for feral dogs. They are more than just a nuisance, they band together in packs and kill. Years ago when I lived in St Louis there was a case of feral dogs attacking and killing the zoo animals. Cats can be a nuisance, but I am not scared of them and I would not be worried about small animals getting eaten by them. Dogs on the other hand.........
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by TNR1 View Post
BTW...I know plenty of well managed urban colonies...so the whole...'only in the county' perception is truthfully a myth.

Katie
I assist in the management of a TNRed colony living JUST outside of the Lincoln Park Zoo, in a very visible and affluent community in Chicago. We also have one (though I don't participate actively with this particular colony) in an alley near my fiance's house. THere is another in the "parking lot" (well, it used to be one, anyway) of our shelter. In all of these cases, they are fixed, vetted, given shelters, fed daily, and monitored closely. Injured cats, sick cats or cats who aren't thriving in the colony or who are friendly or who have armed up to the caretakers are taken into the shelter. We'd take every single one of them, but space is limited...60-80 calls for 2 or 3 open spots in the shelter, on average. And the part of the building devoted to socializing ferals/acting a quiet feral sanctuary is full virtually 100% of the time with spots opening only every few months.
post #17 of 18
Where I used to live, in Sarajevo, both feral dogs and cats were a problem. The cats were tolerated and often fed by well meaning people, though TNR did not exist (except a little by me in my neighbourhood). The dogs were downright dangerous and noisy, as they would chase animals and kill poultry (and there were a lot of people keeping hens and rabbits etc for food in the city -even sheep got killed sometimes) and I was always afraid if a pack of dogs got in my way. They also caused traffic accidents. They were mostly unadoptable unless caught very young. The City's answer was to catch them and gas them - there were no shelters. It was cruel and my friend used to trap as many puppies as she could and rehome them, often in Austria and Germany, but there was a limit and she was the only person working with the dogs. She took two puppies that were dumped at my home. It was a huge social problem, but most people did not have time or money to deal with it.
post #18 of 18
When I clicked on the link it said that I had been banned

I think its the attitude you have been brought up with that determines your feelings. I grew up in the Persian Gulf in a gated community (we called it a "compound") for expats. We first moved there there were no ferals just that some people kept pet cats that they allowed outside unspayed. They were in the minority as most the other residents of ALL nationalities did not do this. However, nature took its course and these pets had kittens who were strays and they had feral kittens. Our cat was vaccinated neutered and kept inside (people drove like maniacs it was never an option for us to let him out).

My mother used to forbid us from feeding the stray kitties because she said it was too cruel, she said that people who fed them but didn't take care of them were not doing the cats any favours. I though my mother was mean and fed them anyway. Only now do I think that she might have been right.

If I was an adult in that situation I would have wanted to TNR those outdoor pets before the situation got insane as it did. Then again their "owners" would have been very angry with me and gotten me in trouble with the authorities. I just know that I lived their for eight years and what was a very preventable situation turned into a disaster by the time I moved to the states for college.

As the country I lived in was a Muslim country there was sympathy for the cats (not enough for a TNR program it would seem ) but dogs were rounded up and PTS. You never saw stray dogs there.
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