TheCatSite.com › Forums › Our Feline Companions › Cat Health › Frankie scared the heck out of me!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Frankie scared the heck out of me!

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
We went to bed late - as in early this morning - and after I got in bed, I heard this horrible gasping, wheezing, juicy sounding retching..I got up and saw Frankie,hunched, head in an odd position, moving from spot to spot - NO liquid coming up. She was clearly in distress and all I could think of was that she was choking as she'd just been nibbling on dry food.

I did the only thing I could think of to do which was to attempt a heimlich maneuver! It worked, though I did not see any food come up, she began breathing, quit rasping,wheezing, though she did a huff about every 3rd breath for a short time. I must have stayed up until 2:30 am watching her, she eventually went back over to nibble some more food.

She's completely normal this morning, but I will be discussing this with the vet to see if she needs to be seen.

Scary as h double hockeysticks, I thought we were going to lose her. The one good thing, she never panicked while I was trying to help her, and exhibited more trust then I expected.

Love this little girl so much, hope I NEVER see a cat choking like that again.
post #2 of 19
Oh the poor baby. I would be terrified. I hope that whatever it was doesn't happen again.
post #3 of 19
Now now Frankie dont scare mommy like that.. I am glad you are doing welll
post #4 of 19
so exactly where did you position your hands during this heimlich. I know how to do it on a person and I am guess its the same for a kitty? Just curious, good info to know. Glad that your kitty is good and that you reacted in a calm and effective manner as well.
post #5 of 19
Oh Bless her little heart and yours too I would have been terrified
post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by puppycat View Post
so exactly where did you position your hands during this heimlich. I know how to do it on a person and I am guess its the same for a kitty? Just curious, good info to know. Glad that your kitty is good and that you reacted in a calm and effective manner as well.
I found mid ribcage and moved down until I couldn't feel ribs (don't recall if cats have a xiphoid process ) and pulled in and up towards me (I was standing directly over her). She's rather plump (!!) so I put a bit of force into it...I didn't think I had anything to lose. I am waiting to hear if our vet wants to see her, but she's eating and breathing fine today.
post #7 of 19
How frightening. It's good that you were able to think and react quickly enough to help her. I'd probably panic. And good for Frankie for being so trusting with you. She just knew her mommy was trying to help her. I hope there are no more problems.
post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jean44 View Post
How frightening. It's good that you were able to think and react quickly enough to help her. I'd probably panic. And good for Frankie for being so trusting with you. She just knew her mommy was trying to help her. I hope there are no more problems.
Me too...I never want to see that again.
post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky View Post
Now now Frankie dont scare mommy like that.. I am glad you are doing welll
Frankie has now gone through 2 of her 9 lives I think!
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat & Alix View Post
I found mid ribcage and moved down until I couldn't feel ribs (don't recall if cats have a xiphoid process ) and pulled in and up towards me (I was standing directly over her). She's rather plump (!!) so I put a bit of force into it...I didn't think I had anything to lose. I am waiting to hear if our vet wants to see her, but she's eating and breathing fine today.
i did this to my 1st cat, Medley, because i thought she was choking on a pill i had given her. i don't think that was the case, tho. she was very ill, had been for over a month, & i was medicating her for the only illness she might've had that was treatable. sadly, she didn't make it. for years i felt like it was my fault, that she had choked on that stupid pill... i now feel like it was just time for her to go, because i know that i performed the maneuver correctly, just like you did.
glad to hear Frankie's doing ok now.
post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by laureen227 View Post
i did this to my 1st cat, Medley, because i thought she was choking on a pill i had given her. i don't think that was the case, tho. she was very ill, had been for over a month, & i was medicating her for the only illness she might've had that was treatable. sadly, she didn't make it. for years i felt like it was my fault, that she had choked on that stupid pill... i now feel like it was just time for her to go, because i know that i performed the maneuver correctly, just like you did.
glad to hear Frankie's doing ok now.
I am so sorry. It's just so hard when we lose them, we realize we can't fix everything, and they can't stay with us forever
post #12 of 19
I'd still go to your vet and figure out what to do next time - I belive the heimlich maneouver is not recommended for people, so I can imagine it's probably not recommended for cats either!!
post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahp View Post
I'd still go to your vet and figure out what to do next time - I belive the heimlich maneouver is not recommended for people, so I can imagine it's probably not recommended for cats either!!
Well I have been retired from nursing for 11 years now, but last I knew, it was still approved for people, and yes, it can be done with cats. I've contacted my vet and heard back from her, no need to see Frankie since she's breathing fine, able to eat etc.
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat & Alix View Post
Well I have been retired from nursing for 11 years now, but last I knew, it was still approved for people, and yes, it can be done with cats. I've contacted my vet and heard back from her, no need to see Frankie since she's breathing fine, able to eat etc.
In Australia it is no longer recommended - they recommend back slaps. Apparently in the US, they are downgrading the use of the heimlich maneouver, and it's a last resort.

Whatever the case, it saved your baby, and how incredibly thankful you must be of your nursing background and having the knowledge and ability to keep a clear head to help your girl!!!!
post #15 of 19
I'd check Frankie's food immediately.

Gizmo had a similar attack over the holiday and I thought I was going to lose her. Her tongue was way out of her mouth and she was wheezing loudly.

I had just fed her 'wet food' turkey with potato. No more turkey, chicken, or poultry for Gizmo forevermore!

Have you given Frankie anything different to eat lately? Her reaction is very similar to Gizmo's allergic/asthmatic reactions.
post #16 of 19
Hi, new here and just got some advice, so I thought I might be able to give some back.

I'm not SURE this is the same thing, but it sounds like it. Was your cat kind of hunched down, like in the position they would eat (or vomit) in, with her head sticking out in front of her low to the ground, and kind of moving back and forth? (Edited: head out low to the ground, chin parallel to ground, nose facing forward.)

The best way I can describe the sound is like gasping for breath but backward. Hard outgoing wheezes? Really, a lot like a human asthma attack (from what I've seen faked on TV, I guess).

Because I had a cat most of my life (who now lives with my mom) who has always done that, anywhere from a couple months to maybe a year between episodes. She's 18 years old now, if that tells you anything. I remember as a kid when it first happened we all freaked out, but now we just try to assure her she's OK and it passes probably within 30 seconds or so.

My new cat, Mikey, has a chronic upper respiratory problem and did the same thing when I got him. I was describing his overall symptoms to my friend who had a cat with similar problems (who also lived to upwards of 20 years if I recall), and she did that asthma attack/coughing thing too.

So not to say all is well and you shouln't watch your cat, but that's one who was recently diagnosed as being OK and two who lived to be OLD who have had the problem described above. I thought all cats did that sometimes, but maybe I've just been lucky to know several of them
post #17 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neko's mom View Post
Hi, new here and just got some advice, so I thought I might be able to give some back.

I'm not SURE this is the same thing, but it sounds like it. Was your cat kind of hunched down, like in the position they would eat (or vomit) in, with her head sticking out in front of her low to the ground, and kind of moving back and forth? (Edited: head out low to the ground, chin parallel to ground, nose facing forward.)

The best way I can describe the sound is like gasping for breath but backward. Hard outgoing wheezes? Really, a lot like a human asthma attack (from what I've seen faked on TV, I guess).

Because I had a cat most of my life (who now lives with my mom) who has always done that, anywhere from a couple months to maybe a year between episodes. She's 18 years old now, if that tells you anything. I remember as a kid when it first happened we all freaked out, but now we just try to assure her she's OK and it passes probably within 30 seconds or so.

My new cat, Mikey, has a chronic upper respiratory problem and did the same thing when I got him. I was describing his overall symptoms to my friend who had a cat with similar problems (who also lived to upwards of 20 years if I recall), and she did that asthma attack/coughing thing too.

So not to say all is well and you shouln't watch your cat, but that's one who was recently diagnosed as being OK and two who lived to be OLD who have had the problem described above. I thought all cats did that sometimes, but maybe I've just been lucky to know several of them
Hi, thank you for your note. But, I have a cat with asthma, and this wasn't that situation, nor was it a coughing/related to upper respiratory problem..she was choking. She's been fine since I did what I could to dislodge what I believe was a piece of dry food, as she'd been eating when this happened.

Try telling a cat to eat more slowly and chew better
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahp View Post
In Australia it is no longer recommended - they recommend back slaps. Apparently in the US, they are downgrading the use of the heimlich maneouver, and it's a last resort.
It's always been used as a last resort. It's never been "downgraded" here in the U.S. As the training we've always taken includes a couple good slaps on the back, then you do the maneuver if the problem still exists.

My wife is a Nurse. She's had the training, and I've also had the training. It's the same as it ever was here in the U.S.
post #19 of 19
I just did a search for first aid, choking and emergency manuveurs for pets and everything I read suggested a "modified heimlich". This is where you place your hands or fist just below the last rib giving 3 to 5 quick thrusts in the abdomen.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cat Health
TheCatSite.com › Forums › Our Feline Companions › Cat Health › Frankie scared the heck out of me!