TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › IMO: In My Opinion › Weight loss pills for dogs...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Weight loss pills for dogs...

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I'd just like an opinion on this.

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?p...dcI14&refer=us
post #2 of 14
Personally I feel it's no substitute for exercise and a diet. But if a dog is physically not capable of exercise I can see a benefit. I hope the vets will use it sparingly.
post #3 of 14
I understand the concern about overweight - excess weight is really hard on dogs' backs and hips.

I'm very leery of taking or giving new medications, though. After it's been on the market for 10 years and has a proven track record, fine - but new medicines, no, not unless they're for something life-threatening that cannot be treated any other way. Too many drugs make it to market only to be proven to have serious side effects once they're tried in a larger population. Overweight dogs can be treated safely in other ways.

We got our dog to lose weight by cutting back on the amount of food we feed her, and substituting canned green beans (salt-free, french-cut so they mix in well with the food) for a portion of her food (advice given by my mom's vet to her for her overweight dog). We also started splitting up her daily food ration into two separate feedings - she now gets breakfast and dinner. That, combined with adding some green beans to her dinner to help fill her up, has helped her to gradually slim back down without her acting like she's being starved. She's maintained her slimmed-down figure for a year now.

http://www.caninesports.com/fatdogs.html is a good article by a vet about overweight dogs.


His point about recommended feeding amounts is important.

For example, here's the feeding chart for the food we feed our dog: Feeding Guideline (standard measuring cups/day)
The recommended amount for our dog's ideal weight of 52 lbs is about 2 & 3/4 to 3 cups. Yet our relatively sedentary dog (she spends most of her time indoors) maintains her weight nicely on only 1 & 3/4 cups daily - the amount recommended on the bag for a dog half her size! If she's very active, we raise it to 2 cups. And if she gets any treats during the day, we cut back the amount of food she gets that night. My mom feeds her extremely active 50 lb blue heeler 2 cups daily, to maintain his weight - about 3/4 cup less than the amount recommended by the manufacturer of the food she feeds.
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by SalemWitchChild View Post
Personally I feel it's no substitute for exercise and a diet. But if a dog is physically not capable of exercise I can see a benefit. I hope the vets will use it sparingly.
Ditto ... I and luckily my vet also try to avoid anymore pills or meds than nessessary
post #5 of 14
Umm...I remember my mom shoving the heart worm pills down our family dog's throat growing up. It would take her a half an hour...
Then again though maybe giving a diet pill would also benefit a human too.
post #6 of 14
My experience is that if you see an overweight dog, chances are so is the owner. Dogs naturally want exercise but will adapt to couch potato humans. Then there are humans who "spoil" the dog by overfeeding. I was in a pet shop recently and saw two little roly poly black and tan dogs. I asked what they were and the gal said "Min Pins" I just about had to stuff my fist in my throat not to say something.

I am not a big fan of Science Diet food, but they have put out a nice book called "Fitness Unleashed" that is free at some vets. It outlines how dogs and humans can exercsie together and take off pounds. I can tell you that there is no better workout partner than a dog. They never say "Oh, I'm tired" or "I don't feel like it" or "the weather isn't that great". All they every say is "We're going OUT?!?
post #7 of 14
Oh, good grief, now I have heard everything.
What is wrong with feeding dogs LESS and having them get more exercise?
I think this is ridiculous.
post #8 of 14
I think it should be used in those rare cases of very very over weight dogs. But after a certian age, dogs just have very little desire to go for a walk. Our dog Pebbles just plan did not want to go for walks anymore after she was about 7. We took her for walks everyday, even taking her down to Presque Isle's waking trails, but she wouldn't get excited. When we would walk she would make a bee-line to the house after a few hundred feet. She wasn't over weight by any means. After a while of this draging her house of the yard, we changed it to 3 then 2 times a week, but she still showed little interest in her walks. She would rather stay in the yard lounging.
post #9 of 14
Overweight dogs is more a problem of owners being too busy, not prepared to actually care for their dogs than the dog's problem.

Every day, I see a lady out walking her two dogs. She lives in our townhome complex (read: no yard). One of the dogs is a little Yorkie, and from appearances is about the proper weight and is happy and hyper, as it should be. The other is a Rottie, and a barrel-dog. (Barrel-dog means their body looks like a barrel - completely round, with four legs, a head and tail.) I see her taking both dogs for walks at least 3-4 times a day (based on when I drive by), but I still think it's just plain cruel to keep a large dog like a Rottie, which should have a lot of energy and plenty of room to run, cooped up in a townhome with no yard.

Another dog I knew, Angel, was a little border collie. Cute little thing. But she, too, was a barrel-dog. Her owner was older, over-weight, and didn't do much. Even though Angel had a huge back yard to run and play in, she preferred to spend her time with her owner, and adopted a couch-potatoe lifestyle. When he passed away, Angel went to another family member, and although I haven't seen her since I really hope that she got out of the rut of being such a couch-potatoe.

Another dog I know, Molly, is a chocolate lab and was bought exclusively as a hunting dog. She lives in an apartment and is kept in a kennel all day. Her owner works long hours - sometimes 12 hours a day. He does take her out for "training" and hunting, but on an average day doesn't get a lot of time to be a dog. She isn't overweight yet, but I'm sure she will be.

The common thread I see in all of these cases is that the owners weren't willing to put in the time to keep these dogs healthy and happy. It isn't fair to large breed to keep them cooped up in a small home with no yard. It isn't fair to them to think that taking them on walks a few times a day is going to give them the exercize they need. And frankly, I don't think that giving them the lately miracle pill to lose weight is going to make up for the years of neglect that made them obese to begin with.
post #10 of 14
I honestly think people do not need dogs if they are not willing to spend the time and commitment to ensure that they get enough attention, exercise, and proper nutrition. A pill does not need to become an "easy way out" for lazy owners.
post #11 of 14
personally, I think this pill is an easy way out for excersizing your dog if it's overweight. I agree with the poster that said usually some dogs are overweight, because the owner is. We have a lady who reclaimed her dog and she is overweight as is her dog. some dogs tend to gain a lot of weight as they get older as labs and they require lots of excersize. dogs need excersize daily and if you can't give them that much, don't get a dog. it's that simple, really! I don't agree with this pill thing. sure, it works for humans but dogs? I would highly doubt it. dog's bodies are a lot different than us and they react differently. I just really don't agree with using this pill on dogs or any other animal. It's just wrong. It's not that hard to excersize your dog to prevent it from getting chunkier and strict diets help, too. and weight gain can be from thyroid problems or other health issues and this pill just doesn't seem right to use on a dog, no matter how overweight the dog is. JMHO
post #12 of 14
I know some people are just lazy and don't care to take the time to exercise their pets, but sometimes it isn't that simple.

Even if someone gets a pet with the best of intentions, and gives it plenty of time and exercise initially, sometimes people's lives change - illness and injuries can happen, the breakup of a family or downsizing or layoffs can prompt a reduction in income and a move to smaller living quarters, or may require the owner to find a different job with a longer commute or working hours. Any of those circumstances can drastically reduce the available time an owner has to exercise the dog. And of course illness or injury can make it impossible to take the dog running, and alternatives may be difficult to find or afford.

Should people in those circumstances get rid of their dogs, if they're no longer able to exercise them in an ideal manner? Good homes are scarce, and I doubt they'd be better off in a shelter kennel.

I'm not saying it's OK to let the dogs get fat, because diet can still be controlled- just that sometimes things happen and life keeps us from doing everything the way we want to or should.
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by tuxedokitties View Post
I know some people are just lazy and don't care to take the time to exercise their pets, but sometimes it isn't that simple.

Even if someone gets a pet with the best of intentions, and gives it plenty of time and exercise initially, sometimes people's lives change - illness and injuries can happen, the breakup of a family or downsizing or layoffs can prompt a reduction in income and a move to smaller living quarters, or may require the owner to find a different job with a longer commute or working hours. Any of those circumstances can drastically reduce the available time an owner has to exercise the dog. And of course illness or injury can make it impossible to take the dog running, and alternatives may be difficult to find or afford.

Should people in those circumstances get rid of their dogs, if they're no longer able to exercise them in an ideal manner? Good homes are scarce, and I doubt they'd be better off in a shelter kennel.

I'm not saying it's OK to let the dogs get fat, because diet can still be controlled- just that sometimes things happen and life keeps us from doing everything the way we want to or should.

Sure- things happen..and circumstances arise. HOWEVER- adopting an animal is a life-long committment. If you are not willing to properly care for that animal for the entirety of its life, reguardless of what circumstances arise- then you need to re evaluate your stance on adopting an animal. Having your circumstances change is no excuse for a dog (or any other animal for that matter) to not recieve proper attention and care. Part of caring for an animal is providing them with a healthy amount of exercise and making sure their diet is healthy. If you're a responsible owner, reguardless of circumstances, you will make sure that your animal recieves the proper care required to live a healthy life....part of this is exercise. There is no excuse for not exercising your animal- especially dogs. If you are not willing to make a life long committment to their proper care reguardless of what circumstances arise in the future, you do not need to adopt. Too many animals wind up in shelters as a result of owners who did not think of adoption as a life long committment- they just seem to discard them when new circumstances arise. I foster- i'm there to see this happen on a daily basis- and it is aweful every time. So i think people really need to weigh all their options before adopting and make sure you're committed for the life of the animal. This committment includes exercise and a healthy diet. A pill should not become an "alternative" for changes in a humans life
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by SalemWitchChild View Post
Personally I feel it's no substitute for exercise and a diet. But if a dog is physically not capable of exercise I can see a benefit. I hope the vets will use it sparingly.
I agree and very well put
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: IMO: In My Opinion
TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › IMO: In My Opinion › Weight loss pills for dogs...