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Biscotte is not feral!

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I have decided that my new little barn cat, who turned up a few days ago, is not feral. After only five days of feeding her, she purrs like crazy when she sees me and rolls over and rubs herself all over the walls as soon as I turn up with her food, and eats with me only a foot away from her. She is still nervous, but sniffs my fingers if I lie my hand by the bowl and does not flinch if my hand moves slowly up and just ruffles her fur. Today I actually petted her ears. I can only think she was dumped on the top road, about a half mile from my barn, and somehow made her way down to it. It is across two fields but would be the first building she would come to. She is in good condition too, not like a feral would be after the weather and conditions we have had. So now I have to decide whether to keep her in the barn (I do need a barn cat and she already likes being with the ponies as she is often sitting above their stall) or take her into the house and introduce her to the others. I am going away at the end of the month for three weeks, and I am not sure what will be easier for the cat sitter either!
post #2 of 22
I vote barn cat, if she likes it!
post #3 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyranson View Post
I have decided that my new little barn cat, who turned up a few days ago, is not feral. After only five days of feeding her, she purrs like crazy when she sees me and rolls over and rubs herself all over the walls as soon as I turn up with her food, and eats with me only a foot away from her. She is still nervous, but sniffs my fingers if I lie my hand by the bowl and does not flinch if my hand moves slowly up and just ruffles her fur. Today I actually petted her ears. I can only think she was dumped on the top road, about a half mile from my barn, and somehow made her way down to it. It is across two fields but would be the first building she would come to. She is in good condition too, not like a feral would be after the weather and conditions we have had. So now I have to decide whether to keep her in the barn (I do need a barn cat and she already likes being with the ponies as she is often sitting above their stall) or take her into the house and introduce her to the others. I am going away at the end of the month for three weeks, and I am not sure what will be easier for the cat sitter either!
First and foremost...take her in to the vet to be checked. She may not already be spayed and will certainly need to be spayed regardless of your decision.

Katie
post #4 of 22
I say bring that little sweetheart in the house!! I'm sure a real feral will come along to be your barn kitty
post #5 of 22
Do you already know who will be cat-sitting Jenny? If so, I would talk to them now. Find out if they have a problem caring for a barn kitty. If you have space in your home, I bet she would appreciate being a pampered hosuecat! Then you could save your barn for cats that are truly feral.
post #6 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by katiemae1277 View Post
I say bring that little sweetheart in the house!! I'm sure a real feral will come along to be your barn kitty
That's what I was thinking!
post #7 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by katiemae1277 View Post
I say bring that little sweetheart in the house!! I'm sure a real feral will come along to be your barn kitty
post #8 of 22
Thread Starter 
Don't worry - she will be spayed as soon as possible. She is still too small I think for that, but she will be vet checked (at the new place I have found for cats) next week. She let me scritch her on the head and ears this morning while she ate, and only insisted on a good sniff of my hand first. My concern on bringing her in is the intro - can I complete it in three weeks before I go? It is a gamble. My cat sitter has one cat of her own (her teenager son will look after it while she is here) but to give her hte responsibility of completing the introduction period may be a bit much. My lot are fighting - they are really fed up with being inside and Wellington has a puncture wound and some fur missing off his face, which I am watching carefully. Biscotte might provide a diversion, but it could so easily go horribly wrong. And it seems mean to just shut her in a bathroom for a full three weeks without me to provide her the right smells and voice for her new home.
post #9 of 22
I think I would leave her where she is until you are back, then take her to the vet etc. It seems too much too soon to try and do all that before you go.
post #10 of 22
I vote to bring her inside now, but only if you have an area of the house that you can isolate her while you are gone in 3 weeks. The stress of a new cat on top of you being gone can be a bit much for cats.
post #11 of 22
Just looking in to see how she is doing and if you have decided what to do yet.
post #12 of 22
Thread Starter 
Everyone is fine, except Wellington keeps picking fights with the others. He has several injuries, torn fur, none serious. I have been letting them into the barn part of the house when there are no workmen there, to give them some space. But last night when I called them back to the (old) kitchen for supper, Ellie didn't come and when I went to look for her I could hear her meowing but couldn't see her. I finally discovered her inside my new bath, trapped by the bubble wrap that is taped all round the top. I have no idea how she got in, because I had to break the plastic to let her out! Unless she crawled up the plug hole! I am coming to the UK tomorrow night for two days, so I will decide what to do about Biscotte when I get back. She is a little love, and I have made a sort of ladder for her with planks and buckets to try and encourage her to come down from the rafters and tall barrels where she is living. This morning she made it halfway as I put her food on a little platform.
post #13 of 22
Thread Starter 
When I went up to feed the ponies and Biscotte this morning, she was waiting for me beside the stable door! She has obviously decided it is safe to come down from the rafters. She played outside in the grass while I cleaned and fed the ponies, and then ate her food there too. She would not let me so near though - it is as if I am a separate person outside to when I am in the barn. I didn't try to get very close though - I am going to have to wait for that now until I have got rid of the ringworm. I got a good look at her though, and I couldn't see any patches of anything, so that is good.
post #14 of 22
I would probably leave her in the barn until you come back. Three weeks might not be enough time to socialize plus your other cats seem to have "cabin fever" terribly (mine do too) and getting another cat in the mix wouldn't be something I would attempt to do at the moment.
post #15 of 22
Thread Starter 
Since we have ringworm in the house I cannot do anything but leave her in the barn for the time being. I am wearing gloves when I go to feed her and resisting touching her. But she is now happily coming down from the rafters when she hears me calling her ( I made her a kitty ladder out of planks and tubs so she could get down) and this morning she rubbed against my boots several times in between eating. So I think she will be easy to socialise, wherever she ends up living.
post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by white cat lover View Post
If you have space in your home, I bet she would appreciate being a pampered hosuecat! Then you could save your barn for cats that are truly feral.
Perfect!!

She's getting braver by the minute Jenny and i know she would love being inside eventually
post #17 of 22
I agree with jennyranson that 3 weeks is not going to be enough time to socialise when the cats main carer is not going to be around. It would also be unfair to subject such a sweet kittie as Biscotti to ringworm
tbh Biscotti only just seems to be getting use to the barn and is yet to see a vet so I'd take it slowly
post #18 of 22
If jenny has trouble with Biscotti can I just point out that we are only just across the channel and we'd take little Biscotti in a shot
post #19 of 22
Thread Starter 
Thanks, Nate, but I think she will be fine here, whether she comes in the house eventually or stays in the barn. She is getting braver all the time about coming down from the hayloft and the rafters. I am putting her food on the floor now and she comes down for it, after a few attempts at the 'ladder' I made her!
post #20 of 22
Aww, thats so sweet that Biscotte is deciding you're alright, even if it is only in the barn! she's so cute
post #21 of 22
I would bring the sweetie into the house and give her a real home and family, not that she doesn't have shelter in the barn, but it's not like a real "home"
post #22 of 22
What a little love! Seems like the best of both worlds right now.

She has a shelter to call home - and the cat sitter doesn't have to climb up to the rafters to leave her food.

Go to England. Take care of the ring worm. You have plenty of time to decide whether she'll be inside only or (one of your) barn kitties.

I'm so glad you two found each other!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Laurie
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