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De-Claw Questions - Page 2

post #31 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazyforinfo View Post
Don't feel bad about getting your two cats declawed. I have always gotten my cats declawed IF they are young.
i also got both Pixel & Mouse declawed as kittens, & was fortunate as they had no problems... altho Pixel has regrown one of hers [this can happen - check your declawed kits' feet occasionally. regrown claws can sometimes cause problems.] Chip is also declawed, but i got him that way. Cable & Java i got after joining here, & i did not declaw them, mostly based on what i learned here. i clipped their claws from kittenhood, & started using the soft claws about 4 months ago. they work great for the 'accidental' scratching they used to do when kneading me. i highly reccomend them. all four use the scratching pads & posts around the house.
post #32 of 59
I'm so sorry your vet did that to you and the cats. Please do not declaw your last kitty. You can learn to clip nails - its easy. Get a good sturdy scratching post/tree (no less then 4 feet tall). Use Soft Claws. But do not declaw.

I've raised several litters of pedigree cats - NONE were ever declawed and the babies were taught where to scratch (as well as had nails clipped on a routine basis) before they even left the house. You can not even tell we ever had cats with claws - none of the furniture is messed up.

My very first cat was declawed (by my parents order) and I cried when Mitten came home with paws bandaged up and he could not even walk right to use the litter pan. He was one of the VERY few cats that never had litter pan issues, biting issues, etc.

You are lucky so far your declawed cats don't have litter pan problems - but they may in the future - they may start using other places to eliminate. Also they could become fear biters.

You're clawed cat can live in the same house with the declawed ones. Declawing is not just cutting off nails - its amputating the first joint of the toe - like cutting your fingers in half at the joint. Use this as a lesson on what NOT to do. Wish you had come to the board and read about declawing first, but you have learned something very important for the future
post #33 of 59
Please dont de-claw your cat, i know im a new cat owner and all but its the equivalent of removing the first joints of your fingers in a human.. it's painful and to keep a good habit of clipping your cat's nails are a good idea. my cat somehow also allows me to file them after their done.. i didnt know better in the beginning and my cat tore shreds of my mattress. and i hear that they have those stick on alternatives that keep the cat's nails nice and blunt.
post #34 of 59
I also wanted to mention that in this area I still have not met a vet that doesn't declaw. It seems the common way to do things around here is to offer some sort of "discount" if a person gets the cat spayed/neutered and declawed at the same time.

I think that like so many things in this country is that the government bends to the revenue end and will always avoid making declawing cats illegal.

I believe that at the very least a vet should have to tell and show a cat owner exactly what a declaw means and I'm sure many would change their mind. Of course that would mean a lot less $$$ for those vets.

It's really sad the way it is pushed without giving honest information.
post #35 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by littleraven7726 View Post
my current situation is renting, most places i've lived require cats to be declawed and i couldn't do that to a kitty.
that is terrible...... .....why cant landloards just say NO CATS ALLOWED.........
post #36 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by mooficat View Post
that is terrible...... .....why cant landloards just say NO CATS ALLOWED.........
my experience is they either say NO CATS ALLOWED or declawed cats only. and the ones who don't care, well those apartments were run by what could be called "slum lords". i've lived in all 3 types of housing (the first before i had cats). i like having cats, so "no cats allowed" doesn't really work for me.
post #37 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by littleraven7726 View Post
my experience is they either say NO CATS ALLOWED or declawed cats only. and the ones who don't care, well those apartments were run by what could be called "slum lords". i've lived in all 3 types of housing (the first before i had cats). i like having cats, so "no cats allowed" doesn't really work for me.
Actually the apartment I lived in (which was nice by the way) allowed cats that were not declawed, but you were only supposed to have one.
post #38 of 59
My apartment only allows one pet but I have 8 cats and 4 rats. There are a lot of nice apartments around here that allow cats with claws.
post #39 of 59
One of my co-workers that rides in to work on occasion with my mom and I was talking about getting a cat. She said it would have to be declawed though. I tried to explain to her what it was and how hard it often is for cats after that, and she told me she has friends that have all four paws declawed on their cats and they have no problems. I told her that it was entirely unecessary and that even though she didn't directly observe any 'problems' that cats are good at hiding it. I then asked her if the cat had litterbox problems. She said the cat used to have problems, but now the lady just lets her outside... She's also not altered. I then asked this co-worker why she wanted a cat. She owns an apartment building and wants the cat to take care of the rodent problem! At that point I told her that she didn't need a cat but a swift kick in the a... Nevermind... She doesn't even like cats! She told me she cares more about starving people than she does about cats. I told her I care more about cats than I do about her friends crappy furniture! This morning I e-mailed her a bunch of listings to some exterminators in her area (I still don't agree with rodent extermination, but I REALLY don't want her to get a cat!)

Anyway, my point to this (aside from wanting to vent) is that some people will just refuse to learn or to look at the declaw issue objectively from a cats point of view. This is SOOOO frustrating, but I'm glad that Gizzy is willing to listen!
post #40 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiffanyjbt View Post
Anyway, my point to this (aside from wanting to vent) is that some people will just refuse to learn or to look at the declaw issue objectively from a cats point of view. This is SOOOO frustrating, but I'm glad that Gizzy is willing to listen!
Maybe she would enjoy some pictures of what a declaw is attached inline in email to her.
post #41 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by tru View Post
Maybe she would enjoy some pictures of what a declaw is attached inline in email to her.
I thought about it, but I can't look at them long enough to attach the image without getting worked up myself!

Plus, I really don't think it would change her mind. She doesn't really care if the cats suffer, so the images probably won't have much of an impact on her. She is one of those people that should NEVER own ANY kind of animal!
post #42 of 59
Thread Starter 
You guys are going to be proud of me. I have just put in order for soft claws for little Twinkie. Thanks to Heather I got the website and ordered it. Twinkie will NOT be de-clawed. She will have her little claws and will be trained not to scratch unless it's a scratching post. However I have not seen her scratch on anything other than that tree. I so wish I didn't de-claw Gizzie and Marbles. I hope they won't have any issues in the future and they won't be going anywhere they will be home kitties.

Thanks to everyone responded!!!!!
post #43 of 59
that's great! did you order her a color??
post #44 of 59
way to go...........I´ve seen the photos of her that you posted in Fur-Pictures she is a cutie .....so once you get her soft-claws, well you know what we need...........MORE PHOTOS with her new nails
post #45 of 59
Quote:
My vet highly recommended doing it since I have nice furniture he says they will ruin it
I read that three times and i still cant believe it
post #46 of 59
Way to go Gizzie!!!!!
post #47 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by katiemae1277 View Post
that's great! did you order her a color??
She is getting Pink... She might hate me for it but she looks like she needs pink for her little Princes self. I will have Twinkie model her new pink nails for you guys. Photos will be posted!!!!

Thank you everyone for all your help!!!! I love this site already.......
post #48 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gizzie View Post
She is getting Pink... She might hate me for it but she looks like she needs pink for her little Princes self. I will have Twinkie model her new pink nails for you guys. Photos will be posted!!!!

Thank you everyone for all your help!!!! I love this site already.......
Cable has beautiful hot pink soft claws & they look lovely on her. i'm sure Twinkie will also look lovely!
post #49 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gizzie View Post
You guys are going to be proud of me. I have just put in order for soft claws for little Twinkie. Thanks to Heather I got the website and ordered it. Twinkie will NOT be de-clawed. She will have her little claws and will be trained not to scratch unless it's a scratching post. However I have not seen her scratch on anything other than that tree. I so wish I didn't de-claw Gizzie and Marbles. I hope they won't have any issues in the future and they won't be going anywhere they will be home kitties.

Thanks to everyone responded!!!!!
Oh, I want to see pictures of her new manicure!!! I'm sure you will find that Twinkie is the prettiest cat in town with her claws. Hopefully you can be a trendsetter amongst your friends who are all telling you to declaw.

As for your vet, alot of vets do it still because so many people demand it to be done. It doesn't bother me so much that he will do declaws as it does that he was pushing it on you. If you decide to change vets, look for one who offers declaws only after the owner asks about it and tells them exactly what it is and what can happen after. It's almost unrealistic in most parts of America to find a vet who never does declaws.

As for apartment renting, my current landlords technically require a declaw, but when I saw that on the lease I asked her, said I would not under any circumstances declaw Zissou but would be glad to sign an alternative wording that stated I was responsible in full for any damage done by the cat, and they agreed. She had recently seen a documentary on it and said she regretted declawing her own cat now and was thinking of changing the lease. There are nice apartments all over that allow whole-footed cats, you just have to be willing to look for them, usually pay a monthly fee, and sometimes do some educating too.
post #50 of 59
Yay! I'm so glad you decided not to declaw your little one! Like many others here, I've had many cats in my time and have never declawed. Even before I knew how bad the surgery really was, it just didn't seem right to me. Only had one problem with claws + furniture, but that was when we were novice cat owners and before we knew about cat trees

Now, for those who use softpaws.... can one of you answer a question for me?

I've always been curious about one thing, and never did get an answer on this. Cats have retractable claws, so normally when they're standing you don't see the claws. But when I see pics of cats with them on, the nails look like they stick out a little bit. Do you think it's still comfortable for them since they can't (or at least it looks like they cant) retract their claws fully? Don't misunderstand me.. I'm not against them... I think it's a wonderful option (much better than a declaw! ) But I guess I can't get my head around the logistics of them on a retractable claw.

Thanks!
post #51 of 59
In the end it's up to you. Most cats are able to be trained where they can and can not scratch. They sell scratching pads that are filled with cat-nip, and you can buy posts and put cat-nip on it, they should get the picture. Limerick LOVES his posts... I would give that a try first. Also, as with any surgery, do your research. There are many internet sources and talk to your vet. But like I said, it's up to you.
post #52 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuttigreeMom View Post
Now, for those who use softpaws.... can one of you answer a question for me?

I've always been curious about one thing, and never did get an answer on this. Cats have retractable claws, so normally when they're standing you don't see the claws. But when I see pics of cats with them on, the nails look like they stick out a little bit. Do you think it's still comfortable for them since they can't (or at least it looks like they cant) retract their claws fully? Don't misunderstand me.. I'm not against them... I think it's a wonderful option (much better than a declaw! ) But I guess I can't get my head around the logistics of them on a retractable claw.

Thanks!

I've been wondering that exact thing myself!
post #53 of 59
I agree with what everyone else has said regarding the declaw. I have had 7 cats and none of them were declawed. There were some instances where I wished they didn't have claws. Over the years I have learned this valuable lesson. If my cats are not behaving properly either they are ill or I am not doing something right. The most important thing is to commit to continually educating yourself on the proper care for your pets. Ten years ago when my first two kitties came into my life I only knew two things about cats. I would never again live without them and I would make sure to learn about and care for them like my family never did. Now, I am considered knowledgeable by most people and my vets. Many times people walk into my home and have said that when they die they want to come back as one of my cats.

My husband is military so we move every few years. It is very difficult to find quality housing with six cats. When we moved here from Germany I had done my research and knew we would have to pay a pet fee. Our strategy was to verify that cats are allowed, but not tell how many unless asked directly (no good to lie). Once we picked our place we spoke with the property manager who said that there was a two pet limit and that some people with three pets had given one up to move in. She also asked if my cats were declawed. I made it very clear that any person who would throw away an animal should never have had them to begin with. I also took the time to explain why cats scratch, that declawing is mutilation and the measures we take to provide appropriate surfaces and training. We also explained that many behavior problems occur when animals are not fixed or are ill. We provided copies of our cats records showing they were all fixed and micro chipped and that they recieve immediate medical attention for any problems. We also have renter's insurance to cover any possible damages. We paid $1050 in pet fees to move in and they made an exception. When we recently decided to adopt a kitten, we went to our rental staff right away to be sure it was ok and see if they would charge another pet fee. They did not. If you are knowledgeable and persistent finding a good rental home may be difficult but not impossible. Also consider getting a renter's insurance policy. They are very cheap and can be used as a barganing chip when a potential landlord is concerned about damages.

While in Germany often we were selected to care for friends and neighbors cats when they came home on leave. Some of the cats were declawed. They still scratched on the scratching posts and pads and climbed our cat furniture. Two of them bit more than usual, but quickly learned that doesn't work in our home. Usually if there is a scratching problem it's because the nails are too long (about two months), or there is an emotional upset. This happened on my husband's first deployment. Thor had never been so difficult and hard headed in all his life. Once I put it together that he was upset over his dad being missing for the first time in his life, I was able to make special efforts to comfort him and reassure him. Suddenly the behavior problems went away. Now whenever we move I get prepared. Sticky tape, Feliway and extra love, attention and play helps make the transitions less stressful for all.

Even with some of the problems I've had with scratching, I would never declaw a cat unless medically necessary for the cat. There are too many alternatives to aid in training and damage control. Besides, there is nothing like watching my cats scale their six foot tall cat trees in mere seconds using their claws, or watching them hanging from one of the posts, or scratching frantically when they get riled up. Claws are fun for them and us.
post #54 of 59
I was not be a cat person and didn't think declawing is a bad thing until two kittens showed up in my life that I couldn't turn them away. NO DECLAWING!! I even get tears in my eyes when I see my cats shivering while I blow dry them after a bath. Just get a couple scratch post and be persistant in getting their paws on the post with their claws out. They will soon know where they can scratch. I trim my kittens nail weekly so it helps in reducing the chance of scratching my leather sofas. I caught them extending their claws out a couple of times while on my sofa but I just say "NO!!!" and for some reason, they immediately retracts their claws.

Be persistant and you and your cat will both be happy.
post #55 of 59
Gizzie try not to feel guilty about declawing your other two kitties. I had my Delilah declawed years before I came on this site and learned more about the reality of the procedure. Luckily we haven't had behavior problems with her, although she is VERY mouthy - she has never bitten per se (as in caused injury), but her way of communicating displeasure is by putting her teeth on you. One of the cats I had growing up, also declawed, was exactly the same way.

I hope little Gizzie's paws are all better now, and I can't wait to see pics of Twinkie with her new manicure!
post #56 of 59
You may not know this, I didn't until I did some research, but in order to declaw a cat, most vets simply cut off the last joint of their little fingers. Imagine yourself missing the last joint of each finger.

That's all I'll say on the matter, as I think it is pretty cruel and should be outlawed everywhere. (in some areas it is. In northern florida there are shelters that make you sign contracts not to have your cats Declawed, and if they catch you getting it done you are subject to civil suits).

Don't get me wrong, I don't think you are a bad person and I'm not trying to make you feel that way. Lots of Declawed cats have happy lives, and if it comes down to having the cat put down or declawing, then by all means, declaw.

One issue you might run into though is that your cats may now be defenseless against the kitten you do not have declawed. It could become an issue later on if they ever get into fights.
post #57 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jokieman View Post
One issue you might run into though is that your cats may now be defenseless against the kitten you do not have declawed. It could become an issue later on if they ever get into fights.
actually, that's not true. i have 2 declawed & 2 clawed in the same household. no issues - they don't really use their claws when 'tussling' with each other. & my declawed cats pack a mean wallop, even without claws!
post #58 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by laureen227 View Post
actually, that's not true. i have 2 declawed & 2 clawed in the same household. no issues - they don't really use their claws when 'tussling' with each other. & my declawed cats pack a mean wallop, even without claws!
I've had the same experience. My one declawed cat rules this house, no question.
post #59 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuttigreeMom View Post
Now, for those who use softpaws.... can one of you answer a question for me?

I've always been curious about one thing, and never did get an answer on this. Cats have retractable claws, so normally when they're standing you don't see the claws. But when I see pics of cats with them on, the nails look like they stick out a little bit. Do you think it's still comfortable for them since they can't (or at least it looks like they cant) retract their claws fully? Don't misunderstand me.. I'm not against them... I think it's a wonderful option (much better than a declaw! ) But I guess I can't get my head around the logistics of them on a retractable claw.

Thanks!
http://www.softpaws.com/faqs.html#question6

"6) Can cats still extend and retract their claws with the Soft Paws®?

Absolutely. Soft Paws® are designed not to interfere with the normal extension and retraction of claws."


The caps make the claws bigger around, but they still go inside the claw sheath. I imagine it's sort of like a person wearing contacts - they take up a little extra space under your eyelid and feel a bit strange initially, but your eyelids can still close, and it doesn't take long to get used to the feeling.

When you put on the caps, you trim the nails, then the caps stick out a bit past where you've trimmed the end of the nail. What you see when you see the colored caps sticking out is about what you'd see of the claws if a cat had untrimmed claws - it's just a lot more visible with the soft paws, especially the colored ones.

We used softpaws for a few months on my cats to protect the new furniture while I retrained them to use their posts instead of the couch. They worked beautifully. I don't need to use them anymore now because the cats don't scratch the couch - now I just keep their nails trimmed so they don't catch on anything or accidentally scratch me. Though, I am considering using them on the cats' back claws since I've noticed some damage to the wooden dresser & desk from the cats clmbing and jumping from them.

If you're considering trying soft paws and are unsure about applying them yourself, you can call around to find a vet or groomer who can apply them for you & show you how to do it yourself at home the next time.

hth
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