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How did you get my son to eat that?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
My nephew came over tonight for dinner and some play time on the Nintendo Wii. I decided to make lamb stir fry. Needless to say he ate it all up and said it was very yummy!

His Mom just called and said he was raving about my meal, and wanted to know what I had made. When I told her the phone went very quiet. She asked me how I was able to get an 11 year old to eat lamb! I told her that I simply didn't tell him, and if he would have asked I wouldn't have made a big deal of it. She was impressed. Anthony, her son, is a very picky eater.
post #2 of 19
I did the same once buy cutting up veggies and baking them like fries - my 3 cousins ate them every time they came to our house thinking they were coloured fries until she told them what they were, now the only veggies they did eat - they wont!
post #3 of 19
Ooooooh, good job...even I wouldn't eat lamb..You would have to try the same trick with me too
post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trouts mom View Post
Ooooooh, good job...even I wouldn't eat lamb..You would have to try the same trick with me too

Lamb is really good if you cook it right. Most people associate it with an Easter meal and serve it with mint jelly. This just happened to be one of my Mom's favorite meals, so when we were growing up I had it a lot. I guess I grew up in an odd family, because the first time I had a dinner party and served lamb, my friends looked at me like I had two heads.
post #5 of 19
The first time I cooked lamb when I moved here I honestly thought they weren't going to eat it, once they tried it they thought it was great, I guess even adults (like Natalie ) can be funny like that.

We had it alot as kids - but the mint was always optional, I personally don't like it with lamb
post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by icklemiss21 View Post
The first time I cooked lamb when I moved here I honestly thought they weren't going to eat it, once they tried it they thought it was great, I guess even adults (like Natalie ) can be funny like that.

We had it alot as kids - but the mint was always optional, I personally don't like it with lamb
I agree! But then again I've never really been a mint fan. I use garlic, salt, pepper, and a dash of basil.
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by icklemiss21 View Post
The first time I cooked lamb when I moved here I honestly thought they weren't going to eat it, once they tried it they thought it was great, I guess even adults (like Natalie ) can be funny like that.

We had it alot as kids - but the mint was always optional, I personally don't like it with lamb
uh.......what do you mean "funny like that"?
post #8 of 19
I've had some delicious lamb in some of the restaurants here and not a mint jelly jar in sight. It really does roast nicely and a lot of the savory herbs compliment it nicely.

As for kids - I've noticed they tend to be more accommodating for everyone but mom.
post #9 of 19
There was never lamb on the table when I was growing up, because Dad (the chef) had very bad experience with it was a child. In those days, it was more likely mutton, and his father insisted that every scrap on one's plate be consumed -- regardless of the fact that the fat made Dad gag. Not a good scenario -- the dogs did well under the table when "lamb" was served.

So, I had it only occasionally, in friends' homes, because even if other branches of the family ate it, they certainly never served it when we were going to be there.

Enter Rob, whose favourite meat is lamb. Who had it often when he was growing up. For whom Birthday Dinner is lamb. Obviously I had to learn how to produce this meal for him. For which I am forever grateful, because I love the stuff. Given that we did his Birthday Dinner on Friday night, you just know what we had, and what we cleaned up last night in a curry. YUMMMMM! Oh, and no mint. I found a wonderful treatment a few years ago, using a beauty paste made of anchovies, garlic, honey and cayenne, slathered all over. It is to die for! And even Dad didn't mind eating it.
post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rapunzel47 View Post
There was never lamb on the table when I was growing up, because Dad (the chef) had very bad experience with it was a child. In those days, it was more likely mutton, and his father insisted that every scrap on one's plate be consumed -- regardless of the fact that the fat made Dad gag. Not a good scenario -- the dogs did well under the table when "lamb" was served.

So, I had it only occasionally, in friends' homes, because even if other branches of the family ate it, they certainly never served it when we were going to be there.

Enter Rob, whose favourite meat is lamb. Who had it often when he was growing up. For whom Birthday Dinner is lamb. Obviously I had to learn how to produce this meal for him. For which I am forever grateful, because I love the stuff. Given that we did his Birthday Dinner on Friday night, you just know what we had, and what we cleaned up last night in a curry. YUMMMMM! Oh, and no mint. I found a wonderful treatment a few years ago, using a beauty paste made of anchovies, garlic, honey and cayenne, slathered all over. It is to die for! And even Dad didn't mind eating it.
Okay you must post how you make that. It sounds so good that I'm going to get some lamb chops this week and make it!
post #11 of 19
With pleasure. If I had realized that I didn't put it in Cattitude I, I would have put it in Cattitude II, because it really is a winner...

Roast Lamb and Anchovies

1 lamb loin, rib roast or rack
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 small can anchovies (including the oil)
2 tbsp brown sugar or honey (I prefer honey)
pinch cayenne

Preheat oven to 400F

Carve a diamond pattern into the fat of the roast using the point of a sharp knife, making the cuts about half an inch apart and a quarter inch deep.

Mix the garlic, anchovies and oil, brown sugar or honey, and cayenne. Rub this mixture all over the lamb, making sure you push it well into the cuts. Put the roast, bone side down in the roasting pan, into preheated oven. Baste it at five minutes, ten minutes, and twenty minutes (if there's not enough to pick up from the pan, just use a little olive oil), then turn the oven down to 350F. Allow 20-25 minutes per pound total time. When done to your preference (we prefer medium rare), remove from oven and allow to stand for 5-10 minutes before carving.

--------
It's intended for a roast, but it seems to me I did at one point do chops (loin chops, skewered together in serving portions) with good success.

Also...unless I have a quite small roast, I generally do a double recipe of goop, so that there's lots to push down into the cuts, and slather over the exposed meat.

This is not a good pan for making gravy, or for roasting potatoes, but we don't miss it. I generally do either scallopped potatoes or a rice dish to accompany it.

Enjoy!

ETA -- The Lamb Curry IS in Cattitude II.
post #12 of 19
I don't think I could ever eat lamb.
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miagi's_Mommy View Post
I don't think I could ever eat lamb.
Not to push, but I'm curious. What is it that you think you won't like? There's lots else to love, so it's no big deal if you never get your head or palate around lamb, but there's so much good about it, it's a shame to miss out for what might be a misconception.
post #14 of 19
I like lamb myself!!
With the kids, you have to be cleaver sometimes and learn to *cover/hide* food that is good for them.
post #15 of 19
I don't eat meat these days (well hardly ever) but I used to love lamb. It is very popular here, there is a lot of sheep-farming in England and Wales.
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miagi's_Mommy View Post
I don't think I could ever eat lamb.
I'm the same way. I don't know why, I just can't eat lamb. Never actually tried lamb, just don't think I could eat it.
post #17 of 19
My aunt cooked mutton and I couldn't stand to be in the house or I'd gag. I'd sit outside where I couldn't smell it. I realize lamb is not as strong smelling but I had a pet lamb when I was a little girl and my head won't let me eat lamb.
post #18 of 19
I had to learn to like lamb.

I went to a quack allergist back in 1995 and was told that I was allergic to nearly everything, really. Some examples:

Beef, chicken, pork, fish, seafood, celery, carrots, mushrooms, rice, corn, milk, wheat, tomatoes etc. etc. etc.

I left his office in tears. All he did was give me a prescription paper filled on both sides with foods I had to avoid and sent me on my merry way! I went to the dietician where I was going to school and asked her what I was supposed to eat. She said to "Drink water and breathe air! That's the most stupid thing I've ever seen. There's nearly nothing left for you to eat!"

Anyway, I think there was a short list of about 9 foods that weren't on the list, 2 being turkey and lamb.

I didn't like lamb the first few times I tried it but one can only eat so much turkey. After about a dozen meals of choking down lamb chops, I now like them.

I grill them with salt and pepper and mint, nothing else. And I know you are supposed to cook it so it's still very rare in the middle, but I won't eat anything partially cooked, so I cook it until there is no pink in it at all but it's still tender and juicy.
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
My aunt cooked mutton and I couldn't stand to be in the house or I'd gag. I'd sit outside where I couldn't smell it. I realize lamb is not as strong smelling but I had a pet lamb when I was a little girl and my head won't let me eat lamb.
Now that I can understand. That puts lamb in the same league as rabbit, which I can't bring myself to eat even though I understand it's very good -- tastes much like chicken, but a bit gamier, so I'm told.
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