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Breeders, How Do You Give Them Up?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I know that breeders are business people and that they breed for various reasons including to improve the breed, go to cat shows and yes to make a little money. Yes, I know often it is a little money.

I have always wondered, how do you prepare yourselves for the kittens and when the time is right, the retiring adults to leave your home?

More importantly, if you have children, how do you prepare them.

Most breeders spend a great deal of time with their kittens to socialize them, get them ready. You have to form some kind of attachments.

Do you go through anxiety separation everytime?
post #2 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaylasmyBaby View Post
I know that breeders are business people and that they breed for various reasons including to improve the breed, go to cat shows and yes to make a little money. Yes, I know often it is a little money.

I have always wondered, how do you prepare yourselves for the kittens and when the time is right, the retiring adults to leave your home?

More importantly, if you have children, how do you prepare them.

Most breeders spend a great deal of time with their kittens to socialize them, get them ready. You have to form some kind of attachments.

Do you go through anxiety separation everytime?
The short answer (at least for me anyway) is a resounding yes, separation anxiety is expected when my kittens leave to go to their new families. I grieve right along with my queen as she adjusts to them being gone. However, as someone who loves my chosen breed with all that I am, I choose to believe I am sharing joy with someone else who feels the same way I do about these cats instead of thinking that I am losing them forever.

My child just turned 22 and hasn't lived here at home with me since he was 17 so I am not able to help you with preparing children ... Matt moved out before I began breeding - but I would say that if I did still have children here, I would have to teach them that these kittens are only ours to hold for their forever families until they can bring them to their new homes.
post #3 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by gayef View Post
The short answer (at least for me anyway) is a resounding yes, separation anxiety is expected when my kittens leave to go to their new families. I grieve right along with my queen as she adjusts to them being gone. However, as someone who loves my chosen breed with all that I am, I choose to believe I am sharing joy with someone else who feels the same way I do about these cats instead of thinking that I am losing them forever.
Exactly that!!! I make sure that the homes that my babies are going to are safe and sound an I expect regular updates from the new owners. Although I am always upset when the kittens leave me, I do know that they are going to forever homes where they will be loved and cherished, the "other child" as it were.
post #4 of 12
It is a great feeling to know you raised a loving addition to a new family. I enjoy knowing that my baby is bringing others joy. It is rewarding when the new owners update you and thank-you for them and how much it has brought to their lives. It is hard to see them go. I have cried about one or two I have been pretty attatched to.
I have only one female, and I am getting ready to retire her. She is my first and will be 4 in may. I have decided to have one more litter to keep one. Then I will be spaying her, and placing her in a new home. It will be hard, she is my first and has been such a great mom. But at the same time, she has been such a good mom and has brought me many great kittens, pretty much she has done a good job and to reward her for her being such a great cat, we want to make sure she lives out the rest of her life as a happy, healthy pet living in a family home as a loved pet, while she is young still (she is here, no cages and very loved, but, we have other cats and want her to be just a pet with out lots of other cats and kittens) My male will be neutered and we are keeping him though. Alot of breeders place their cats too, for the same reason, so they can live as a pet. But, I think a lot of breeders stay really small too, and keep their retirees, because it is hard to find a home for a loved member of the family.
As for children, I have a daughter who just turned 4, she has a hard time with a few, but she is starting to understand. Besides I bribe her. I tell her when the kittens are in new homes we can have new baby kittens to raise and love for awhile, and if we kept these ones we can't have more!
post #5 of 12
I'm not a breeder, but I can comment on letting the kits go. The breeder I got Mosi from is a new breeder - Mosi's litter was her first litter. She said it was awful letting the kittens go after having them for 3 months, and at first she said she wasn't going to do it any more because she couldn't bear to go through it again. After a short while though she changed her mind and Mosi's mum is going to have another litter early next year. It must be so difficult, but I assume knowing they are going to good homes and keeping in touch with them as they grow up helps.
post #6 of 12
I agree with every word gayef writes.

And the joy you feel when you receive pictures and phone calls from the kittens new home. The joy... it can't be described.

However I wouldn't call myself a business person, not at all. If breeders usually make some money I'm doing something really wrong because I haven't been able to make a penny on breeding cats.
post #7 of 12
That's easy. Before I bred any of my rexes, I had a waiting list of people interested in adopting them after 4 months old. So it was not so hard to place them in loving arms knowing where they were going.

Sure I usually had a few tears, but knew they were gonna be spoiled. I even told one friend that if she was not already taking Tommy boy (a gorgeous red tabby rex) that I would have kept him myself and showed him (Tommy was shown).

When you go into breeding you should have the mindset that you cannot keep ALL kittens you have and if you can't do that, then don't get into breeding
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sol View Post
I agree with every word gayef writes.

And the joy you feel when you receive pictures and phone calls from the kittens new home. The joy... it can't be described.

However I wouldn't call myself a business person, not at all. If breeders usually make some money I'm doing something really wrong because I haven't been able to make a penny on breeding cats.
Hehehehe - I do agree! I find that my pockets are rather more empty now (what with the showing internationally) then ever!

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenKitty45 View Post
That's easy. Before I bred any of my rexes, I had a waiting list of people interested in adopting them after 4 months old. So it was not so hard to place them in loving arms knowing where they were going.

Sure I usually had a few tears, but knew they were gonna be spoiled. I even told one friend that if she was not already taking Tommy boy (a gorgeous red tabby rex) that I would have kept him myself and showed him (Tommy was shown).

When you go into breeding you should have the mindset that you cannot keep ALL kittens you have and if you can't do that, then don't get into breeding
Here, here! You do need a spcific mindset to be a breeder...and it's a tough one.
post #9 of 12
I see it as sort of like fostering kittens. When you foster you go into it knowing they are not really yours and will be leaving. That makes it easier. Easier but not easy. I get attached to some of the kittens and my kids (ages 13 and 11) also get attached to some of the kittens. But after they leave and new kittens come around they forget about the previous litters and focus thier attention on the new kittens. My daughter is at the age now where she wants her own cat to raise, show, and breed. I've let her pick one out from my newest litter and hopefully it will be show quality. I know it's at least breeder quality. She has to help me with almost all aspects of all the cats now in order to pay off her kitten. And she's dedicated to learn as much as she can about the breed and the breed standard. I think it's a great arrangement and it helps her to not be so sad about kittens leaving when she has one that is hers.
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
I want to thank each one of you that responded. I learned alot from what you shared and I have not been ignoring you. I have been tied up with life stuff and worried about my newest baby Masquerade. I have posted about it on the other breeder forum, her stitiches came loose under ner skin along her spay incision and she developed a hernia that required more surgery to repair early this week. I heard from Teresa, she is doing great, up and running around and everything is functioning normally. I can hardly wait until the end of the month to get my hands on my new baby.

Again, thank you all so much for taking the time to respond.
post #11 of 12
Its hard. But if you go into it knowing full well they must go on to their new homes..it..i dunno its still hard, lol

But there is nothing better than updates. I got one update from the new meowmy to one of my boys and she put it best I cried because I was so happy he was making her feel whole. she said simply "He is the utter love of my life"

and one of my other meowmys who took two of the boys, she is lways telling me of their antics and how much enjoyment she gets out of them.

That to me is what makes it all worth while
post #12 of 12
I've never bred cat's, but I have bred dogs before. You get so attached, it was horrible letting them go to new homes. I wanted to cry. But you have to think about it sensibly and know that you can't possibly care for them all. You have to do what's best for the babies.
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