New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Maine Coon X Ragdoll

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I have a friend whose female Maine Coon inadverdently mated with his male Mink Ragdoll. These three beauties are the result.










All three are females and all three are just as sweet as they can be.
post #2 of 20
Oh dear God, they are so beautiful. OK, I'll take them......all.
post #3 of 20
They are cute. But I sure hope your friend will be neutering/spaying them before leaving AND be sure that situation doesn't happen again.

I do hope your friend knows that the "pointed" gene is NOT allowed in the maine coon breed!
post #4 of 20
Thread Starter 
The mother, father and all three kittens have been "fixed." LOL

What is a pointed gene? I don't breed so I know absolutely nothing about this stuff.
post #5 of 20
Yeah, Pointed Gene? You mean the ears?
post #6 of 20
May I have the one in the middle, please?
post #7 of 20
Thread Starter 
He is keeping all three, sorry. I can't say that blame him, they are adorable!
post #8 of 20
The "pointed" gene is the one that creates the siamese/himalayan, birman, ragdoll, snowshoe cats. Its a white/cream body with dark "points" on ears, feet, tail, and a face mask.

Point colors are seal (black), chocolate (brown), blue (grey), lilac (greyish pink), cream (light tan), red (dark orange/red), tortie (red/black) bluecream (grey/tan). I think I hit all of them
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenKitty45 View Post

I do hope your friend knows that the "pointed" gene is NOT allowed in the maine coon breed!
Sorry, Im having a blonde moment...I dont get it?

I dont see any of the kittens being pointed, and how do you know the Maine Coon has the pointed gene?
post #10 of 20
Since all the crosses are now fixed it won't matter. However IF those kittens who were 1/2 maine coon, 1/2 ragdoll (which carries the pointed gene) were put in a maine coon breeding program, some of the kittens would wind up adding the pointed gene to the maine coon breed.

Maine coons are accepted in every color EXCEPT the pointed pattern. I was thinking this person bred both maine coons and ragdolls. You didn't want the pointed gene to be introduced into the MC breed. That's all.
post #11 of 20
Oh look at those little doll babies!!!!
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenKitty45 View Post
Since all the crosses are now fixed it won't matter. However IF those kittens who were 1/2 maine coon, 1/2 ragdoll (which carries the pointed gene) were put in a maine coon breeding program, some of the kittens would wind up adding the pointed gene to the maine coon breed.

Maine coons are accepted in every color EXCEPT the pointed pattern. I was thinking this person bred both maine coons and ragdolls. You didn't want the pointed gene to be introduced into the MC breed. That's all.
Interesting...I get it now
post #13 of 20
The only thing that interests me in this oops breeding is...What does the coat feel like??? A ragdoll coat or MC coat and to push it further, was the MC parent tight coated??? The LH coat is a geiven (obviously!) but what about the texture?
post #14 of 20
All three of those kittens are adorable. My favorite one is the one in the top picture.
post #15 of 20
Thread Starter 
Abymummy

The MC mother does have a tight coat. The Ragdoll father is a Mink. All of the babies got their mother's coloring pattern and their father's texture, very plush, soft and silky. They got their mother's intelligence, curiosity, determination and their father's good nature and loving ways. Really a terrific combination, imo.

From top to bottom is: Honey Clover Sugars
post #16 of 20
I am only replying to the pointed discussion of this post. Since the Ragdoll is a "mink", it most likely was the result of a "mink" and a pointed Ragdoll, so it should carry the pointed gene, but since the Mink male was bred to a Maine Coone, which shouldn't carry the pointed gene and is not a pointed female, it would not have created any pointed offspring.

I would also like to state, since this is in the breeders section of the forum, this is another reason for pediatric spay/neuter, to help prevent these "oops" litters.
post #17 of 20
Thread Starter 
Familytimerags

How young do you think it would still be safe to have a kitten spayed or neutered? I have no idea.

I do understand that breeders not only want the breed lines to stay pure but to also be improved upon, but I have to say these "oops" kittens are absolutely adorable.
post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaylasmyBaby View Post
Familytimerags

How young do you think it would still be safe to have a kitten spayed or neutered? I have no idea.

I do understand that breeders not only want the breed lines to stay pure but to also be improved upon, but I have to say these "oops" kittens are absolutely adorable.
I would never deny the cuteness. All 3 are adorable. I am going to place 2 links for you to read, one is regarding pediatric spay and neuter, also referred to as early altering, as well as the studies that have been done on pediatric spay and neuter that shows many of the benefits of early altering kittens.
http://www.winnfelinehealth.org/repo...ly-neuter.html
http://www.winnfelinehealth.org/heal...ay-neuter.html

I have a 5 year old that was altered at 11 weeks old, and has not had any health issues, and it was so nice to have our pet come to us neutered, and not have to worry about it being done later.
Since then, my vet has done many, many spays and neuters, between 10-12 weeks of age, with out ever any problem. The incision is very small, and the kittens come home with the littermates and Mom, healing time is quick, and you really can't tell they have even went through the spay or neuter surgery.
If you have any questions regarding my experiences with early altering kittens, please feel free to PM or email me.
post #19 of 20
Thread Starter 
Thank you very much FamilytimeRags, I will read those articles very carefully.

If it is safe, I totally agree that it would be preferable.
post #20 of 20
What beauties, they are gorgeous
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Showing and Ethical Breeding