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Should I let my kitten lick his paws after declaw?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
hi
I just got my 7 month old kitten declawed. He came home with a cone colar on his head so he woldn't lick. I have tried to get him to used yesterdays news litter but I have another adult cat who refuses to use anything but clumping so the kitten has been using that box mostly. Now there is litter in his scabs. I tried to clean them but ouldn't get it all out. Should I just let him lick his paws clean?
How long should I leave the colar on him for?
Any advice would be great!
post #2 of 18
Hi Stella, welcome to TCS.

Please be prepared for some potentially negative responses - people here at this forum are dead set against declawing as it is a very cruel thing to do to poor kitties.

I can't give you any advice about it, as I have not had either of mine declawed, nor would I ever.

I would assume that you should help your kitty to keep the area clean, but would recommend that you call the vet that performed the surgery for aftercare advice.
post #3 of 18
I will second the advice to call the vet.
post #4 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by stellacosmo View Post
hi
I just got my 7 month old kitten declawed. He came home with a cone colar on his head so he woldn't lick. I have tried to get him to used yesterdays news litter but I have another adult cat who refuses to use anything but clumping so the kitten has been using that box mostly. Now there is litter in his scabs. I tried to clean them but ouldn't get it all out. Should I just let him lick his paws clean?
How long should I leave the colar on him for?
Any advice would be great!

Hi Stella Welcome to the site

Do you think you could try using a second litter box with the Yesterday's News until kitty's paws heal? The clumping litter might be painful for them.

Also, I would call the vet and ask them about the collar. I am not sure on that.

Good luck!
post #5 of 18
You will need to get a clean litter box for your little one and use something like shredded newspaper in it until the wounds heal - I am certain the vet must have given you some sort of post-operative instructions, including what kind of litter arrangement would be best - did he not?

As for the problem at hand, you should alert your vet and ask if you should bring your kitten back in to have the wounds irrigated and properly cleaned. Take that clumping litter out of the litter box and do not let him use it again until the wounds have healed.

Poor little guy ... I sincerely hope he feels better soon.
post #6 of 18
I would again suggest calling the vet. I'm a little surprised that they took the bandages off so soon. When I got my cat declawed (before I knew what it was) they instructed me to keep the bandages on for at least a full week, and his poor little paws still got infected. That is what concerns me most about your situation with the litter and unbandaged paws. Obviously litterboxes in general are going to contain bacteria, and especially if he's got litter stuck in his open wounds, I would be very concerned about possible infection.

Please keep a close eye on him, in any case, for signs of infection and dehydration. Is he on pain management meds? Watch for lethargy, additional sensitivity to the paws, unwillingness to walk to eat, drink and use the litterbox. Check him for dehydration using the "pinch test" - gently pinch the skin up on the back of his neck (like scruffing him, but only pinch hard enough to pull the skin up from his neck). If the skin snaps back quickly, he's fine. If it kind of sticks in place for even a little bit, he is or is getting dehydrated and needs to be taken to a vet right away.

I don't mean to scare you, but I almost lost my Trent because of the infection in his paws and dehydration. So it is a serious complication to watch for.
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by stellacosmo View Post
hi
I just got my 7 month old kitten declawed. He came home with a cone colar on his head so he woldn't lick. I have tried to get him to used yesterdays news litter but I have another adult cat who refuses to use anything but clumping so the kitten has been using that box mostly. Now there is litter in his scabs. I tried to clean them but ouldn't get it all out. Should I just let him lick his paws clean?
How long should I leave the colar on him for?
Any advice would be great!
the only problem with that is the clumping litter can make lumps in his tummy. try secluding the kitten in a separate room with his own litterbox, food & water until his paws heal enought to use the regular litter again. leave the collar on until his paws are healed. if it prevents eating, you can trim it a little.
and i agree that calling the vet would be a good idea. my vet has prescribed triple-antibiotic ointment for my adult cat, b ut i don't know if that's ok for a baby.
post #8 of 18
Please use yesterday's news for litter until the kittens paws heal. Also please be careful and keep an eye on him if he is licking his paws. A friend of mine's cat chewed the glue off a little and bled quite a bit. The kitty had to be rushed to an ER Vet to stop the bleeding. They were lucky everything turned out ok.
post #9 of 18
In regards to a cat licking their wounds, that could introduce bacteria into the wound causing infection. Also as has already been mentioned, kittens cleaning clumping litter out of their paws can cause internal problems as the llitter could clump inside them. It wouldn't take much of an accumulation with a kitten. And of course as others have already said. Call and get the kitty back into the vet for proper cleaning and don't let kitten get into the clumping litter anymore.
Good luck with the healing process.
post #10 of 18
Hi--I have had all of the cats that I have ever owned declawed. Here is my advice....If the older cat won't use the yesterday's news litter add just a bit of her litter to the box. Not much mind you but enough so that there is the scent of it. That is what I have done when having declawed new babies so that the olders may know what to do. None of my cats have ever come home with a collar so I can't comment on that. Seems like an interesting idea though. My cats never had bandages either, they just came home. None of my cats ever got infected in their toes. I think, and this is just me, that some licking would help the healing process. Not biting or chewing just licking. I would think that it would help with swelling and give the kitty some comfort. Again, that is just me, I have no scientific proof of this. Good Luck with your baby. If you would like you may contact me privately and I will help more if I can.
post #11 of 18
I also think that licking is part of the cat's natural biology for cleaning itself and healing, so it's probably good for the wounds.
post #12 of 18
I have seen many kitten paws get serious long term infections because they used regular litter! Definately seperate the kitten and use yesterdays news. Yeah it may be a hassle now but it will potentially save you many vet trips to treat infected and painful paws. Leave the ecollar on for a while at least until the paws look like they have healed up because you do not want the kitten to lick open the sutures and bleed all over your house, and you dont want to make a run to the emergency vet because the kitten is bleeding because they can be expensive
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by treeelf View Post
I have seen many kitten paws get serious long term infections because they used regular litter! Definately seperate the kitten and use yesterdays news. Yeah it may be a hassle now but it will potentially save you many vet trips to treat infected and painful paws. Leave the ecollar on for a while at least until the paws look like they have healed up because you do not want the kitten to lick open the sutures and bleed all over your house, and you dont want to make a run to the emergency vet because the kitten is bleeding because they can be expensive
I agree, the kitten should be separated and put in a room with the newspaper litter. That's most likely why kitty was licking in the first place, IMO. Personally, I am against declawing, but I know someone who had her cats done years ago. The vet gave strict instructions on not using regular litter for about a week.
post #14 of 18
Any time we have a cat declawed we use strips of paper as litter and the vet usually says stick with that for about 10 days as far as the cleaning goes I would call the vet or if she cleans them watch for bleeding
post #15 of 18
I am a vet tech, and all of my cats are declawed. I would put the kitten in a separate room with the yesterday's news, and or newspaper litterbox. A little licking is OK (the kitten will help keep the incision clean), but excessive licking is bad (none of mine ever wore an e-collar). Also do call you vet and make sure what their instructions are and that you follow their instructions first and foremost.
post #16 of 18

Don't put anything on the incision sites right after declaw! The skin needs time to grow around it. If you put Neosporin, A&D or whatever your trying to use it will dampen the skin and it's more likely the incision will break open. It's tough enough to restrict the cats activities, and it just came from the vet- you don't need to bring it back. Just keep administering the antibiotic.

post #17 of 18
Welcome to TCS, Blah. I expect you found this thread through a google search, but the threads do have dates: you're replying to a thread from 2006, so kitty's paws have long since healed. (I hope!!!) smile.gif

Just for the benefit of others, TCS is an anti-declaw site. (http://www.thecatsite.com/t/239112/forum-rules See point #4 under "Cat Care Policies, Guidelines and Stances).

Of course we help people who have already had the procedure done, but for people considering it, there are many reasons not to declaw your cat. http://www.thecatsite.com/a/declawing-more-than-just-a-manicure
post #18 of 18

Weren't you given any advice from the vet when you picked your cat up after the surgery?  You can't use regular litter after a declaw.  I'd call the vet to find out what they advise.  I wouldn't be surprised if it's recommended that you bring your cat back in to have his paws flushed and to be put on an antibiotic if he's not on one already.

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